New Music.

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New Music.

Anyone got any NEW music recommendations? 

I like Sculthorpe, Part, Bowie, Adams and lots of Glass and some Reich.

Don't like Tavener, The Protecting Veil, what a nonsense. 

 

 

 

Pause for thought.

RE: New Music.

Atonal,

Here are a few composers and works I have enjoyed:

Ades - Violin Concerto

Aho - Clarinet Concerto (seek out video if you can!)

Unsuk Chin - Violin Concerto (for me better than John Adam's concerto, and equal in affections to the Peteris Vask's VC)

Henze - Pollicino (a fairy tale for children)

Kurtag: Kurtag's Ghosts (not so much a single composition but a tapestry, where Kurtag links piano pieces from many composers with threads of his own - very fun)

Lutoslawski - take your pick, but good choices include the 3rd symphony and Paganini Variations

Rihm - a great place to start is his works for violin and orchestra with Mutter a great advocate (avoid Tutuguri until you are sure you are fan - it my current K2; I still cannot get to the summit!)

Sciarrino - Suo poeme concentrici (three works to accompany Dante's Divine Comedy)

And much as it mught cause others to chuckle I would always recommend John Cage, Harry Partch and Morton Feldman. I have never heard Partch's music live (and unless I end up living in the US I probably never will!) but it is so contrary to everything I understood about music (microtonal, defiantly different and a huge part of the origin of the Tom Waits 'sound', which I love dearly).

I keep explaining to my wife that when we finally decide to take our own home I will need a small shed some distance from the house. What she does not know yet is that I want to put a system in there so I can sit back, close my eyes and bathe in the sounds of 'For Bunita Marcus' played at full volume. Odd to think I would follow that up with Liszt... probably.

 

Naupilus

RE: New Music.

I likes modern music it can be very useful. I goes into the barn and puts on a Terry Riley CD and wife thinks I be busy working away on me tractor banging on endlessly. I puts some cotton wool in me ears and gets some sleep I do.

RE: New Music.

I'm a bit of a fan of Sally Beamish, does that count as 'new' music?

RE: New Music.

Sally Beamish has some good, in a way, compositions. She is a contemporary composer, in any case.

Personally, I found very little in what you may mean in "new" music. However, two, at least, Polish composers, namely Bacewitz and Kancheli have some interesting stuff to listen to.

The Finnish Saariaho has been honoured with an extensive discography. She is, somehow, intriguing and fascinating. Her Opera "L'Amour de loin" is interesting, in various ways, indeed.

However, have you covered all the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Post-Romantic, early, mid and late 20th century composers, so that you need "new" music (and how new, actually)?

Anyway, it's your call, after all.

Parla

RE: New Music.

tagalie wrote:

As for the Wife Issue, I've found a three-pronged approach works best:

1) Take baby steps. Don't start out with something that sounds like raccoons amongst the trash cans, at max volume. 35 years ago my wife thought Prokofiev was too 'jumpy'. Today she counts Berg amongst her faves.

2) Intersperse stuff that you like with stuff that she likes. In our house two cds of bed-of-nails music equals one Joni Mitchell.

3) Buy headphones.

Tagalle

I think I need to make clear that the proposed shed is neither a place of seclusion or that my wife objects to my music (she is remarkably open to my tastes, while I struggle with her tastes on occasion!). It is just that when we stop moving around (three continents, three jobs and five homes in the last ten years!) and have saved up enough money (if the children don't take it all in college fees!) I want to semi-retire and have a workshop to indulge all my hobbies, including Feldman. Imagine a shed like the one Mahler had in Toblach and you'll have a better idea... in return I have to build a kitchen with bells and whistles. It is a fair deal I feel.

One example of my wife's very remarkable ease - she allowed me, when creating an itunes mix for our two year old, to include Feldman. I wonder how Feldman would have felt, sharing a playlist with Sesame Street Greatest Hits and Saturday Night Fever (which remarkably was the first music our boy ever danced to). Only one item was vetoed by the higher power - I did so much want to put Woody Guthrie on the playlist.

Naupilus

RE: New Music.

Atonal wrote:

I like Sculthorpe, Part, Bowie, Adams and lots of Glass and some Reich.

Michael Torke  '...has been described a both a post-minimalist and a post-modernist.  The former label has been applied him because his highly energetic music appears to have its roots in the tightly organized rhythmic systems of Glass and Reich, while the latter is due to his cool, polystylistic eclecticism.'  The Rough Guide to Classical Music

I like him because of his tunes.

RE: New Music.

Devon Farmer wrote:
I likes modern music it can be very useful. I goes into the barn and puts on a Terry Riley CD and wife thinks I be busy working away on me tractor banging on endlessly. I puts some cotton wool in me ears and gets some sleep I do.

NURSE, he's out of his bed again!

Pause for thought.

RE: New Music.

Atonal wrote:

 

I like Sculthorpe, Part, Bowie, Adams and lots of Glass and some Reich.

 

I dont sees how you liking David Bowie and Bryan Adams makes you an expert on new music, I did like thaart film with Kevin Costner mind you. And come on, nobody likes Scunthorpe. Thars one born every minute there is.

RE: New Music.

Devon Farmer wrote:
Thars one born every minute there is.

Yadda yadda yadda!

 


Pause for thought.

RE: New Music.

Parla wrote:
However, have you covered all the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Post-Romantic, early, mid and late 20th century composers, so that you need "new" music (and how new, actually)?

No of course I haven't Parla, but I love new discoveries and soundscapes. Contemporary composers should at least be listened to. Where would your beloved Beethoven have been without Razumovsky, etc?

Thanks all for your recommendations plenty to go at this weekend (when Six Nations Rugby isn't on the TV).

Naupilous - I love the Ades violin conc. also his piano quintett is also very worth listening to. Just had a quick listen on Spotify to 10 mins. beginning of For Bunita Marcus, looking forward to letting it 'wash over me' too.

Tagalie - thanks for the three step approach. My F.P.O. (Fun Prevention Officer) can be such a scathing critic.


Pause for thought.

RE: New Music.

 

Hi Atonal!

Interesting question. Back in the 80's and 90's I used to listen to quite a bit of what were the contemporary British composers - Knussen, Benjamin, the Matthews Brothers Colin and David etc...

I have Knussen Symphonies 2 and 3 plus opera 'Where the Wild Things Are' all on Unicorn vinyl, plus Benjamin Piano Sonata on I think Nimbus vinyl. (He was lucky enough to study with Messiaen).

However, my listening habits have changed in recent years, and I nowadays find that my two biggest areas of interest are: sacred music (anything goes - from Medieval to contemporary minimalism) and 20th Century still, BUT I became a convert to the Polish post-war composers (and Eastern European).

In other words, I explored a lot of Ligeti (Wergo vinyl as well as general CD's) and my 'Polish quartet' of Penderecki, Lutoslawski, Gorecki and Panufnik.

Personally I found that I really connect with this 'Polish Post-War School', so here are a few suggestions. I know they are not exactly news anymore, as Tagalie says, and only Penderecki is still alive:

So, when you have done your homework thoroughly as instructed above by Parla, then you may of course explore the following:

CD's

Penderecki - Symphony 3 on Naxos 8.554491. In my opinion, a great piece. As good as Lutoslawski Symphony 3 even.

Penderecki - Symphony 2 and 4 - Naxos - 8.554492. 4 is interesting. 2 is a bit Brucknerian.

Ligeti - the Ligeti project 2 onTeldec - Berlin Phil/Nott, includes Lontano (great piece and short) Apparitions, Atmospheres and San Francisco Polyphony ( all goodies).

Boulez conducts Ligeti on DG - concertos for cello, vioin and piano - Ensemble Intercontemporain - et al...

Lutoslawski - a good series on Naxos - one of my favourite works is this: Preludes and Fugue for 13 solo strings (this CD) Naxos 8.555270. Also of course as Naupilus says the Symphony 3, (not on this CD) which became the work that really brought Lutoslawski wider recognition towards the end of his life.

Panufnik - well any of the symphonies, especially Sacra, Mistica or Di Sfere -a good CD is the last two under Atherton with LSO - a CD transfer from the original vinyl, and I still have Sinfonia Sacra on Unicorn vinyl - Monte Carlo Orchestra - I forget the conductor offhand!

Panufnik's daughter Roxanna is also a composer - though I am yet to make her musical acquaintance.

Ligeti Requiem (mine is on Wergo vinyl) a modern masterpiece, in my opinion of course.

Touching story to end: apparently Penderecki went to visit Gorecki in hospital the day before he died back in November 2010, and promised an 80th birthday concert. That should I think be due next year for Gorecki 2013 - so let's hope it comes off!

Regards

Mark

Partsong

RE: New Music.

kev wrote:

My shed served as a smoke room (until I gave it up).

Seeing as we're having a friendly chat, may I ask you about your current photo naupilus?  As a Time Team fan, I've noted that there appears to be a remarkably preserved archaeological site in the photo (no satellite dishes, tv aerials, cars, people).  So where is it?

[/quote]

 

Kev,

No smoke in my home I am afraid since I gave up the sheesha...

The photo is of the city of Aït Benhaddou, Southern Morocco. If you are a fan of the movies it has appeared quite a few time; one of the most famous films being Gladiator. My wife and I backpacked thorugh Morocco (I have a powerful love of deserts so I dragged my 'mountain range' wife through the Sahara that trip). The photo is mine - my other major hobby.

 

Naupilus

RE: New Music.

Mark

I have been circling the Panufnik symphony cycle that has been coming out on CPO but not tried anything. Which symphony would you recommend as a first listen?

Naupilus

RE: New Music.

It's a nice picture but its not a patch on Dartmoor and that sheep in the background has got a large lump (maybe two) on its back and should be taken to the vet straight away it should.

RE: New Music.

Sorry for intruding, but I happen to somehow appreciate the Panufniks.

For the father's Symphonies, you may start probably with his most "popular", namely the no.3 "Sinfonia Sacra" or, for something more innovative and inward the no.6 "Sinfonia Mistica".

For the daughter, who is almost totally devoted to choral music, I found the Spirit of the Saints quite captivating. It exists along with other words of the also visually charming Roxanna on a CD of Regent. Another interesting and very religious work is the Padre pro prayer from a CD of Sixteen on Coro with works of MacMillan and Todd.

Good hunting (and haunting with this kind of music you explore...).

Parla

 

 

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