Pole dancer.

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Pole dancer.

I'm a European. I like paninis, I like panna Cotta, I like piano forte, I like panna kournikova, I like panam airlines, I like the panama canal, I'm as european as you can get without having a bidet. So what about Panufnik. A Pole working in the UK is pretty run of the mill these days, but I don't want a dentist and I don't want a plumber. Anyone prepared to 'give it up' for Panufnik. Explore (ex Decca) have symphonies 5 and 6 at a very good exchange rate. But I've thrown good money at these second rate Poles before, Arvo Part has left a very bad taste in my mouth and I like taramasalata. £4.50 on Amazon, deal or no deal.

RE: Pole dancer.

:-D

RE: Pole dancer.

Hi Hugh, have you thought of moving to Devon? The farmer there would probably get on very well with you.

He seems to like sitting under bridges, so you'd have that in common as well.

P

RE: Pole dancer.

Hi Hugh!

Go on youtube and listen to the Panufnik Violin Concerto at a mere twenty-two minutes. It is a beautiful piece.

Also try Sinfonia Votiva 1st movement (Symphony 8) and if it's on (I think it is) Sinfonia Sacra 1st movement (Symphony 3).

You will not be disappointed...

Mark

Partsong

RE: Pole dancer.

Arrh Mr Partsong, I'm glad you called. You have been banging on about 20th century Poles for as long as I can remember. Lutoslawski and Pendereki make a lot of noise but I haven't found the music yet. Arvo Part, not a Pole admitted, but near enough, is a little bit too smug and needs to base his works on more than five seconds of ideas. So I was a little bit tentative of a Pole with less of a reputation. However Mr Panufnik (admittedly only symphonies 5 and 6) has been a complete revelation. Why isn't this composer better known. I've cleared my shelves of all composers yet to hit the spot to make room for more Panufnik. Symphonies 1, 3 and 4 (emi) and symphony 9 and piano concerto (conifer rca) on order. Now sit down Mr Partsong and tell me everything you know.

RE: Pole dancer.

If, dear Hugh, you are so fond of Mr.Panufnik's music, try his daugter Roxana too. You may like even her music. Perhaps, her Westminster Mass or the Spirit of the Saints or, for something more inspiring, give a shot to her "Beastly Tales".

As for the father, I trust you may get nuts with his Cello Concerto with Rostropovich, on NMC, and, if you go deeper to his music, CPO has embarked on a fascinating journey of recording every possible "masterwork" of this...Polish underdog.

Parla

RE: Pole dancer.

parla wrote:

I trust you may get nuts with his Cello Concerto

Parla

 

Not really sure what you mean there Parla, but if they are giving away nuts, count me in, I want nuts, I want nuts, I choose almonds, I want nuts.

I have noticed his 8th symphony is available on a cheap 'helios' CD, though it comes with a work by Roger Sessions. uuum, he sounds a bit wierd from what I've heard. Still, I want nuts, I want nuts...

RE: Pole dancer.

Hugh,

Did not the shepherd leave his flock and go looking for the sheep that had strayed?

You, my friend, have been found and saved. Rejoice!

I am delighted that you have discovered Panufnik. Will be back later today....

Partsong

RE: Pole dancer.

Hi Hugh!

Just for you, I had a listen to the CD of symphonies 5 and 6 this afternoon. It's probably the same CD with LSO/Atherton. 5 (Symphony of Spheres) is a tremendous piece, with prominent parts for piano and drums. Both are good, but it struck me today that 5 in particular is.

I also like very much 3, 7 and 8. Symphony 1 (Rustica) is also pretty good too! You'll enjoy three with its opening fanfare for four trumpets, 7 is for organ and strings, very intense, and 8 (I have it on vinyl and it's the same one as the one you mention - well it's well worth it even if the Sessions isn't particularly to your liking - or mine).

His music is very listenable, and I take your point about both Penderecki and Lutosalwski being noisy. Penderecki is definitely noisy, both in his earlier avant-garde and his later post-Romantic works. His concertos for vioin, cello and viola are less noisy. Lutoslawski's best bets might be his earlier (1950's ) works like the brilliant Musique Funebre for strings in memory of Bartok, and the Concerto for Orchestra.

Besides the symphonies, well there are a number of short and really haunting pieces by Panufnik like Landscape, Katyn Epitaph and Autumn Music. The Tragic overture is very powerful indeed.

Then there are the concertos for violin, bassoon and piano and the sinfonia concertante - symphony 4. The violin concerto is a favourite piece -very searching and soulful, for just violin and strings. The bassoon concerto is also a goodie.

Happy listening!

Mark

PS I also have the conifer CD you mention with symphony 9 and Piano Concerto.

It's all good...

 

Partsong

RE: Pole dancer.

Good stuff! Personally I think the rest is up to that standard. I'll have a listen to 9 tomorrow, which I've been saving for a while...

I'm sure you'll like 3 and 8 as I say. The only ones I don't know are 2 and 4 (4 is the Sinfonia Concertante). I don't know that CD of 1, 3 and 4 - my 1 and 3 are on Unicorn vinyl.

Gotta dash....

Mark

Partsong

RE: Pole dancer.

Hugh, don't overestimate a nice and interesting footnote of Classical Music History, that is Panufnik. He is not even the shadow of Shostakovich, albeit intriguing and, at times, even "entertaining". Even the "Poles" do not have him that high in reputation or appreciation.

Enjoy his music, if it is attractive to you, but do not get that...excited. 1975 still is the year to remember.

Parla

RE: Pole dancer.

 

OH FOR GOD'S SAKE!

Here we go again.

Parla, Panufnik is much more than a footnote to musical history. The fact that you describe his music as nice and entertaining shows how little you actually know of his deeply heartfelt, tightly disciplined and spiritual music.

 

Partsong

RE: Pole dancer.

Parla, I shall elaborate further just for YOU my friend, for unless I put you out of your misery, I shall not sleep.

Like you Parla, I am under pressure, for I have started my new placement today, and as I speak to you, the spaceship is encircling the West Pennine Moors, bringing strange creatures with clipboards who speak in an equally strange language known as officialese.

These people are known by the dreaded word inspectorate, and I have been drafted in at the last minute, headhunted even, to assist this poor place of learning to pass muster. As Nabokov says, the death penalty is passed to the condemned in a whisper.

And so Parla, I bring you these gifts, I ask you to make them Holy by the power of your Word: Listen Up Bud.

Would you call a piece of music written to commemorate the slaughter of 15,000 Polish men, the cream of Polish intelligentsia, in Katyn Forest, a nice and entertaining piece? (Katyn Epitaph). Stalin's forces long-held accountable. These men were made to dig their own graves and then shot in the neck.

Would you call a piece dedicated to the composer's brother, who died in the Polish resistance and was buried in the front garden, a nice and entertaining piece? (Tragic Overture). The composer having lost his manuscripts in war-torn Warsaw due to a landlady's thoroughness in cleaning out her house, he was able to re-construct the score from memory, and dedicated it, 'to the memory of my brother Miroslaw, a valiant member of the Polish underground army, who fought and lost his life in that tragic uprising' (sleeve notes to Unicorn LP RHS 306). 

Likewise would you call his violin concerto, composed 'to exploit to the utmost Yehudi's rare powers of spirituality in his interpretation' (composer's memoirs page 319) a nice and entertaining piece?

Autumn Music, composed in 1960 in memory of a friend. Writes Panufnik, 'I was responding to the end of a suffering human life and to the season of Autumn with all its manifestations in nature'. (Sleeve notes again to RHS 306).

To mention just one of the symphonies, the Votiva (no. 8) is dedicated, ' to the miraculous ikon of the Black Madonna of Czestochowa in my native Poland. This picture of Our Lady...is reputed to have supernatural protective powers; it always has been, and still is, the sacred symbol of independent Poland'. (Sleeve notes to Hyperion A66050).

He was a man who expressed suffering and devotion and spirituality in his music, and for me Parla, he is much more than entertainment...

Mark

Partsong

RE: Pole dancer.

Mark, all the examples you mentioned for some of Panufnik's works are the premises, the intentions of the composer, not the outcome, the result. And we know where the best intentions do lead, don't we?

I don't care that much about the reasoning or the motivation of his music but rather the outcome and his works do not reveal any particular profundity or true spiritual achievement. I have his Piano Trio (on Acte Prealable), his Cello Concerto (on NMC) and I follow the CPO series of his Orchestral works (now on Vol.5). I found his outcome a decent effort to express his views musically and, in quite a few cases, his symphonic works sound less offensive than other contemporary "enfants terribles". So, in comparison, he may be considered as even "entertaining".

In other words, the man (and he is not the only one in the contemporary conundrum) fails to express what he is supposed to portray, at least to a considerable extent. Of course, if I have to take him seriously and try to necessarily trace the "miraculous icon of the Black Madonna...", I might find his music even boring and irrelevant. That's why I said it is a footnote of the Western Music. Even in his native land, they don't commemorate him enough and his influence, after his death, is fading away.

Parla

RE: Pole dancer.

I have his Cello Concerto (on NMC)

Parla

[/quote]

Did you get the free nuts?

RE: Pole dancer.

Not exactly, Hugh, but I can get a nutty listener with it.

Parla

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