Visconti's "Death in Venice" and Mahler's Adagietto

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Visconti's "Death in Venice" and Mahler's Adagietto

Once I read that had been Visconti's "Death in Venice" film, which mades Mahler's 5th symphony "Adagietto"....famous! What do you think about this?, because in first place, in my opinion "Death in Venice"'s version of the "Adagietto" is the worst of all I've heard, bad played and bad recorded, by a mediocre orchestra. On the contrary, I think that the Adagietto would be precisely withing the something few good things of the film. I must to say that italian cine -and in general also french cinema- always has deceptioned to me,  I think inclusive that the best of Fellini's films would be Nino Rotas's music, about the contents I dont like them. What do you think about this??oscar.olavarria.

RE: Visconti's "Death in Venice" and Mahler's Adagietto

It's probably correct to say the film made the adagietto, at least, famous. What people who bought the 5th for that one movement thought of the rest of it, who knows. 

And what about the people who bought Also Sprach Zarathustra after seeing Kubrick's 2001? Must have been quite a shock to them.

No, the version Visconti used isn't the best but his linkage of sound and visuals was excellent as it is later in the film when we hear "O Mensch, gib Acht!" from the 3rd.

RE: Visconti's "Death in Venice" and Mahler's Adagietto

tagalie wrote:
And what about the people who bought Also Sprach Zarathustra after seeing Kubrick's 2001? Must have been quite a shock to them.

I remember seeing 2001 when it first came out and, as well as my first exposure to Also Sprach, I remember being fascinated by the use of Ligeti's Aventures and Requiem - I hadn't heard anything like it before.

(Interestingly, as I learnt later, Kubrick had used the music without asking Ligeti first. And the inevitable copyright suits followed once he found out...) 

 

 

RE: Visconti's "Death in Venice" and Mahler's Adagietto

Music in film is much more powerful than the average film-goer appreciates I'm sure.  For me it is often overwhelming.  Peter Weir uses music to incredible effect.  Top of my list is Picnic at Hanging Rock, and after seeing Master and Commander I had to buy the soundtrack on CD.  An amazing recording too, by the way.  Yes, music can affect film to a great extent.

Vic.

RE: Visconti's "Death in Venice" and Mahler's Adagietto

I don't think there can be any doubt that Visconti's use of the music presented the adagio to a wider audience and possibly then a fraction of those got to know the work in total, which has to be a good thing.

Personally I think the adagio from the sixth might have been a better use, but film directors should make their own choices! The most affecting use of Mahler I know was in Michael Cimino's 'Year of the Dragon' where they use the choral entry from the last movement of the second symphony in combination with the funeral of a key character. And while we all know Beethoven I thought the choice in 'The King's Speech' was also very appropriate. The main issue is always that once you combine music with strong cinematic images it is difficult to get the images out of your head!

As for Italian cinema I would say that Paulo Sorrentino is one of the best directors out there and while 'one swallow does not a summer make' there is a enough creativity and interesting things gooing on in Italian/French cinema to keep me going for many years. 

Naupilus

RE: Visconti's "Death in Venice" and Mahler's Adagietto

VicJayL wrote:

Music in film is much more powerful than the average film-goer appreciates I'm sure.....

Vic.

I very much agree, Vic.

There was a fascinating documentary on the BBC some time ago where they looked at this in some depth and repeated various excerpts from reasonably well-known films but each time with different music to accompany the scene. It was very interesting the way that, even for a very short snippet of action, the different moods were very quickly established. This was particularly evident in the scenes which did not have obvious and expected associations with a style of music  - Errol Flynn swings from the yard-arm, cutlass in hand  as Korngoold blasts out, etc - but where the viewer did not quite know how the scene was going to develop.

JKH 

JKH

RE: Visconti's "Death in Venice" and Mahler's Adagietto

Adrian wrote:

You sound very bitter , any chance of a explanation?

Yes, Adrian.  The explanation is, it's another Brodsky wind-up.

Vic.

RE: Visconti's "Death in Venice" and Mahler's Adagietto

VicJayL wrote:

.  Top of my list is Picnic at Hanging Rock, and after seeing Master and Commander I had to buy the soundtrack on CD.  An amazing recording too, by the way.  Yes, music can affect film to a great extent.

Vic.

Vic does like watching young girls, and a bit of man on man brutalism as well it seems. 

RE: Visconti's "Death in Venice" and Mahler's Adagietto

Vic, I have sent a message to the mods. asking for the previous message, and the idiot behind it, to be removed.

RE: Visconti's "Death in Venice" and Mahler's Adagietto

I, too, have filed a complaint.

Plum

RE: Visconti's "Death in Venice" and Mahler's Adagietto

Hi Vic. I have also just sent two messages asking for two comments to be removed asap.

Mark

Hi Ludwg. Hpe u don mind me sendin u a txt mes. How u doin? - Yrs. Frz Scbrt.

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