*do* you still actually buy CD's?

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*do* you still actually buy CD's?

 

Ok, a bit embarrassing maybe on a forum for a magazine, who's core busyness is reviewing new CD's but... I don't buy them anymore... Did it for years, have hundreds still spread out in the house, but there are so many online alternatives out there (Concertzender, Concerthuis, BBC player), I don't need new CD's anymore... Are people here with the similar experience? Do you still buy (classical) CD's?

Rolf

 

RE: *do* you still actually buy CD's?

Hardly.

I've always been a work-centered collector, not a performer-centered one, so I never felt the urge to rush to the cd-store when a new album by a promising artist was released.

Also, Brilliant Classics spoiled me. Here in Holland their releases were availabe at dump prices at a large chain of drugstores ("Kruidvat"), box-sets at often less than 1 euro/cd. Bought hundreds of those, and consequently I wasn't prepared anymore to pay 18 euros for a full-priced cd at a regular store.

Also, also, downloads being available, a cd or usb-stick full of mp3's so much more convenient for car use than a glove department full of individual cd's...

RE: *do* you still actually buy CD's?

Yes I buy CDs and have no intention of going down the download route. I have got nothing against modern technology, but this is just not for me. And before you accuse me of being a luddite, I have a degree in Physics&Electronics and have been a computer programmer for nearly 30 years. The last thing I want to see when I get home is another computer (or similar), which is also why I have stuck out with vinyl for so long.

 

As for sound quality, I can see why an uncompressed file will give better quality than a CD or LP as there is no noise, jitter, scratches, fingerprints, or other effects. However, most downloads are very low-fi MP3 and sound awful.

Down with Downloads - the revolution starts here!!!!!

 

DSM

RE: *do* you still actually buy CD's?

Yes, I do. I prefer CDs. After buying a CD I digitize it immediately (ie, create aac/mp3 versions) but I prefer to have control over the quality of the conversion (often purchased mp3s have limited quality) and to be able to play it in the CD player whenever I like. And I do like a physical product of a CD, something I can't explain. Having said that, I do buy digital music as well, especially when good deals are around, but I prefer the physical product still.

RE: *do* you still actually buy CD's?

Don't trust CD's, never have. You can never get the needle to follow the grooves, damn thing always slipping off. I'm sticking with cassette tapes and piano rolls. You know where you are with those. The interweb is a huge communist conspiracy, I've seen the matrix so I know what I'm talking about. Turned the sound down though, don't like talking pictures.

RE: *do* you still actually buy CD's?

Don't trust CD's, never have. You can never get the needle to follow the grooves, damn thing always slipping off. I'm sticking with cassette tapes and piano rolls. You know where you are with those. The interweb is a huge communist conspiracy, I've seen the matrix so I know what I'm talking about. Turned the sound down though, don't like talking pictures.

RE: *do* you still actually buy CD's?

Hi Rolf!

Nice to hear from you!

Well, after long stalling I gave in and eventually and did my first download a few weeks ago. The only reason that I did it was because the item was not available on CD, had never been released on CD, and I wasn't too keen on trying to hunt down an old LP of it [Currently without an LP player]. That said, it has tempted me to do some other downloading. Must admit, I love my liner notes, etc., and would probably only do so if I were able to get all of that easily [Unless again, it's a very old recording and those kind of things are not available].

I do love having the physical product though if for no other reason than to be able to play on my stereo system (I did make a physical copy to play on my stereo from that one download). Also, unless the recording is quite old, I would prefer not to buy anything other than some sort of lossless format.

Rolf (or anyone else here),

Do you happen to know roughly when timewise (or otherwise), at what point would it make a significant difference to shift from say 320 kbp to lossless? When the recording is digital? Or earlier?

Best wishes,

Petra

p.s. I'm fortunate that there are several record/CD shops in the near vicinity--mostly used though they do carry some new items. I normally order the new items myself as they don't carry much new classical music (the one store that does carry new classical does not carry much that interests me sadly).

 

 

RE: *do* you still actually buy CD's?

Pretty much like ganymede said above. I buy, rip and store them. There's no better backup than the original cds even knowing that your hds are duplicated. The printed material is a great bonus imo and is essential when it comes to vocal, choral and stage music. Besides, sometimes I don' t wanna touch computer and/or server: just spin them in the old fashioned way.

 

 

 

RE: *do* you still actually buy CD's?

No, and I don't buy the gramophone either.

RE: *do* you still actually buy CD's?

Petra

There's a lot of debate about this...........and a fair amount of controversy. 320 mp3 is actually very high quality. Hardly anyone cannot tell the difference between mp3 (even quite a low quality mp3 and a losless format) in blind testing. I've done it myself and I can't (and like everyone else here, I like to see myself as a very sensitive listener). If there is an audible difference, it can only be discerned on the very finest equipment (which most of us don't have) and only in optimum conditions and only in a minority of recordings. Other people will probably tell you otherwise - actually, my hearing is ultra sensitive, blah blah blah - but I honestly wouldn't ever worry about it.

It is a bit like the SACD controversy: SACD never beats CD in blind testing (it is just a marketing gimmick for "audiophiles" with lots of cash; the main reason it is dying out, in fact), but when people aren't being tested they swear they can really, honestly tell the difference.

RE: *do* you still actually buy CD's?

320 kbps offers superb sound. FLACs come over at about 400-800 kpbs but, as Jane says, who can tell the difference? Perhaps only cats and bats. I find that lower bitrates are also exceptable unless very high frequencies are involved. Solo violin (i.e. high above the stave) is impossible to listen to at less than 256 but I have guitar music recorded at 128 (even at 96) and it is perfectly acceptable. It always amuses me to find pre-war recordings offered as FLAC. Pristine digitilization of less than pristine originals! LOL

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