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John Reed as Major-General Stanley in The Pirates of Penzance (credit: Tully Pot

Obituary: John Reed

John Reed, who died in Halifax on February 13 – his 94th birthday – was for many the embodiment of the true Gilbert and Sullivan tradition represented by the “old” D’Oyly Carte Opera Company, which in 1982 ceased its continuous performances that had begun in 1875.

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Theclassicalshop.net

Theclassicalshop.net relaunches with a new look and new features

Theclassicalshop.net, launched in 2005 by Chandos, has been re-launched today with many new features. As well as a much more stylish design, with easy access to the many labels on offer, the site has been reworked for ease of navigation.

James Jolly
Patrick O'Connor

Patrick O’Connor remembered

Gramophone's editor-in-chief James Jolly pays tribute to Patrick O’Connor, who has died aged 60, a Gramophone critic much-loved by both readers and colleagues.

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Allan Wicks, Canterbury organist (photo: Kentish Gazette)

Obituary: Allan Wicks, organist and choirmaster

When cathedral organists are judged by posterity, attention understandably turns to their performances, either as remembered by those who heard them, or captured on disc. In the case of Allan Wicks, who died on February 4,...

Martin Cullingford
Gramophone March 2010

March 2010 Gramophone out now: Mahler special issue

Has any composer been more debated than Gustav Mahler? It took tireless advocates like Leonard Bernstein to heave his reputation back into the mainstream during the past century, but now he is among the most performed and recorded of composers.

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James Gaffigan, moving to Lucerne (photo: Margaretta K. Mitchell)

James Gaffigan to head Lucerne Symphony Orchestra

James Gaffigan is to take up the role of chief conductor of the Lucerne Symphony Orchestra from the 2011/12 season. The 30-year-old New York-born musician first conducted Switzerland’s oldest symphony orchestra in 2008, and it was following his return in June last year that the offer was made. He states his aim is to increase the orchestra’s international profile, citing Mariss Jansons’s achievements with the Oslo Philharmonic or Neeme Järvi’s with the Gothenburg Symphony as models to aspire to.

Martin Cullingford
Leon Botstein: programming courage (photo: Richard Termine)

Programming the rare and unusual - the ASO's courageous 2010-11 season unveiled

One of the most often voiced criticisms of concert programmes – and particularly of orchestral concert programmes – is the lack of courage when it comes to unusual repertoire. Such criticism is silenced, for New Yorkers at least, with the announcement of the American Symphony Orchestra’s 2010-11 season. Returning to Carnegie Hall (where they gave their first concerts in 1962 under Stokowski), the orchestra will be conducted in all concerts by Leon Botstein, a champion of unusual repertoire. Indeed there’s not a single ‘core’ repertoire work in sight! The season comprises:

James Jolly
George Benjamin's Piano Figures

George Benjamin's limited-edition birthday CD

Composer, pianist and conductor George Benjamin turned 50 on January 30 and will be celebrating that important milestone with a concert at London's Queen Elizabeth Hall on Sunday, February 7. The day before his birthday he recorded his 2004 composition Piano Figures , "ten short pieces for piano solo" at Nimbus's Wyastone Concert Hall in Monmouth. One hundred CDs will be pressed – each is numbered and signed by the composer – and will be made available at the QEH concert.

James Jolly
MTT's triple-winning Mahler Eighth

The Grammys 2010

This year's Grammys, presented in Los Angeles last night, offered an eclectic and at times surprising line-up of winners. The overall prize, the Best Classical Album, went to Michael Tilson Thomas's SFSO Mahler Eighth, a recording which also took the Award for the Best Engineered Album and the Choral award. The Orchestral category was secured by James Levine's Boston Symphony disc of Ravel's Daphnis et Chloé on the orchestra's own label.

James Jolly
La Clemenza di Tito opens the renovated Teatro San Carlo (credit: Francesco Sque

Naples opera house reopens after spectacular renovation

The Teatro San Carlo, Naples's historic opera house, formally opened its doors to the public after restructuring work with a performance of Mozart's La Clemenza di Tito yesterday evening, the 254th anniversary of the composer's birth. A capacity audience of 1400, including the Italian president Giorgio Napolitano, witnessed the austere but elegant spectacle of Luca Ronconi's production, conducted by the theatre's current musical director Jeffrey Tate, with Gregory Kunde in the title role.

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