New Speakers Guys

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New Speakers Guys

Good Evening Gents,

I have the greatest of pleasure to inform you all that I have just taken delivery of a pair of Burmester B10 Speakers (at a cost of no less than £2950.00) to listen to my extensive collection of classical music both on record and CD.   

I am currently using Chord Rumour cable on these beasts, but would care for any suggestions in terms of an upgrade cable?  I find the current cable sounds a little harsh in terms of highs produced, especially when listening to choral and symphonic renditions.

Yours,

Clive P.

Hope you're not serious

Check out the discussion on 'Cables before and after burn-in' and after you've followed the links, if you're still convinced you need an upgrade ........................

Thank you for the reply, much

Thank you for the reply, much appreciated! Burning these little 'devils' in will take a while.  

By the way, do you think these boxes would burn-in quicker with symphonies (louder, more intense stuff) compared to chamber etc, dear fellow?

Yours,

Clive

BTW, listening to some Scarlatti at the mo.  Lush! Next up LvB 8th!!! Wifey and I are living the dream - money well spent

burning money

As has been argued here before, fancy cables are principally a way to burn money. If your new speakers sound a bit harsh, there are better options to investigate:

1 Room acoustics. High frequency resonances can be very unpleasant and tiring. The solution is a more damped acoustic, with rugs, soft furniture etc. If you dislike the esthetics of that route and prefer a more modern minimalist esthetic, there are very good looking damping panels.

2 You may suffer from clipping signals. If you are using a small low powered amplifier, it will clip the signal if you play demanding music. The solution would be a much more powerful amplifier, with a beefy power supply. Fortunately, watts are cheap these days. Another source of clipping could be clipping of the signal from a loud source like a cd player into an amplifier with sensitive inputs (this is quite common). The solution is in-line attenuators.

3 Finally, the cause could be a harsh sounding speaker..... I hope this is not the case. If it is, using the tone controls on the amplifier or in the equalizer of your computer's audio player may do the trick.

Willem

Tone controls

Not many people mention tone controls any more since the hifi press convinced many that their use was somehow criminal. No recording is perfect and many need a shade of adjustment. And with the new interest in LP's good tone controls are essential.

There may not be the need for filters as Quad and Leak provided,but some form of adjustment is needed. My Marantz has a middle range control which I find very handy for aggressively recorded voices.

 

I think that any decently made OFC cable will do for speakers. Fancy types with fancy names and fancy prices may appeal to those who see hifi as some sort of status symbol. As the old saying goes. A fool and his money are soon parted.

 

Regards,Sedgley

Exactly

Agreed on all counts, Sedgley. With my main rig in a large room that's rather 'bright' - hardwood floors and lots of windows with no curtains - I sometimes apply a touch of treble cut to edgy recordings. Trouble is, 'edgy' really refers to high mid-range rather than true treble, so I don't get quite what I want and lots of modern recordings, tailored for ipod listening with a very aggressive high mid-range, still sound too harsh. Some of Decca's recent efforts are ghastly.

 

Strangely, mid-range controls still seem to be the exception on home hi-fi equipment yet they've become quite common for in-car sound.

what was the original question?

Somebody buys new loudspeakers and asks about cables.

Suggest he burns in the boxes first, yes, that is important according to the manufacturer.

Secondly, the boxes in question have built-in adjustments for listening rooms including a foam damper and a positive-negative switch for base. Try that.

Thridly, try the endless suggestions of normal loud-speaker cable, solid household mains wiring, and the expensive, but for some not-to-be-trusted dedicated loud-speaker cables. If you have a sensible dealer, he will let you borrow burnt-in cables for a trial session. Otherwise, do not trust your dealer.

 

Furthermore, who wants to listen to compressed recordings intended for Ipods, when you are spending so much money on loud-speakers for HIFI?

No need for in-line attentuators.

And when do we need tone controls these days? For LPs? 

 

Just wait and listen to how the speakers are in a few weeks. But they do need good stands which are recommended by the maker. And they are hand-made in Germany. Can't be bad with their excellent reputation. Plus point is that the reviews of these speakers are positive, when you treat them as the manufacturer intented.

What are burnt in cables?

What are burnt in cables? Molten plastic insulation?

Willem

socratesgwr wrote:

socratesgwr wrote:

 

Furthermore, who wants to listen to compressed recordings intended for Ipods, when you are spending so much money on loud-speakers for HIFI?

 

And when do we need tone controls these days? For LPs? 

 

I'm talking about cds not compressed downloads. The Chailly Brahms and Beethoven cycles on cd are woeful recordings. As is the Pacifica Shostakovich String Quartet cycle. Airless, over-miked, artificially-balanced, high-mid boosted, all of which might sound fine on a cheap mobile player but not on gear that aims at fidelity, i.e. what you hope to hear in a good concert hall.

Which is why, or one of the many reasons why, we need tone controls.

Burn-in and burn-out

Audiophile burn-in is a largely imaginary phenomenon, audible only to those blessed with golden ears, that is said to affect usually thick cables carrying audio signals with extremely low levels of current compared to the cable's carrying capacity.

 

It is not to be confused with anything concerning high current loading and its impact on cable integrity. I have mentioned elsewhere the memorable sight in East Africa of overhead power lines that glowed a dull red in the dark due to being overloaded by numerous illegal connections. That was a true example of burn-in, often closely followed by a burn-out or power cut.

Roderick

poor quality CDs

Tagalie replied,

"I'm talking about cds not compressed downloads." 

In that case I can understand your problem. At my local dealer, one is allowed to listen to CDs before purchasing. They have a copy of each CD dedicated for this purpose. Different issue when one purchases CDs via websites. But not had any real problems although most recordings I buy are from small specialist producers rather than giants like Decca. 

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