New Speakers Guys

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recording quality

Recording quality is a very real issue, and the more, the more revealing your replay system. CD offers the possibility of greater dynamic range and lower distortion than vinyl, but many modern recordings are indeed more compressed than is acceptable (some compression is probably inevitable to make large scale music playable in a domestic acoustic).

However, none of this has necessarily much to do with the OP's problem of harsh/bright speakers: does the problem also exist with good recordings like many live concerts from Wigmore Hall, or classic Philips CD recordings from the Concertgebouw?

Willem

socratesgwr wrote:

socratesgwr wrote:

 At my local dealer, one is allowed to listen to CDs before purchasing. They have a copy of each CD dedicated for this purpose.

 

Those days seem to be gone in most places. Fortunately our local library has a good music selection that's kept well up to date.

But what I really miss is the Sounds in Retrospect section of the Gramophone back in the day. Not always did I agree with their assessments but they gave you a benchmark and if you knew the equipment they were using - I seem to recall they started out with Quad and switched to B&W, with various amps and players, later - you could make your judgements accordingly. That kind of (reasonably) objective review of recording quality is very difficult to find today. Your only hope is to get to know the reviewers and decide whose defintion of 'good recording' comes close to your own. 

Winter is coming.......

tagalie wrote:

Fortunately our local library has a good music selection that's kept well up to date.

Mine did, too, until a year or so ago (Huddersfield.) There was a whole room in the basement dedicated to music and much of it was classical. Also, a wide range of musical scores and books on classical music.

Now its all gone. British libraries get funding based on "lends" and not enough people borrowed the music. So they ditched it all and replaced an entire room with a skimpy little rack attached to the main lending library. Ditto for the "classic" literature, most of which has been binned. 

Everything for dummies

janeeliotgardiner wrote:

 

Mine did, too, until a year or so ago (Huddersfield.) There was a whole room in the basement dedicated to music and much of it was classical. Also, a wide range of musical scores and books on classical music.

Now its all gone. British libraries get funding based on "lends" and not enough people borrowed the music. So they ditched it all and replaced an entire room with a skimpy little rack attached to the main lending library. Ditto for the "classic" literature, most of which has been binned. 

 

For the arts in general, one of the most worrying trends, world-wide.

Without good radio and a fine local library, I never would have got to know classical music and literature. As long as availability is linked to popularity we'll be condemned to pop classical concerts, pulp fiction, pap on the radio and youngsters will be totally ignorant of alternatives.

Recently, at a self-styled exclusive used book shop, I asked the assistant if she had any copies of Powell's Dance to the Music of Time in hardcover. 'Have you looked in the ballet section?' she asked.

tagalie wrote:

tagalie wrote:

For the arts in general, one of the most worrying trends, world-wide.

Without good radio and a fine local library, I never would have got to know classical music and literature. As long as availability is linked to popularity we'll be condemned to pop classical concerts, pulp fiction, pap on the radio and youngsters will be totally ignorant of alternatives.

Recently, at a self-styled exclusive used book shop, I asked the assistant if she had any copies of Powell's Dance to the Music of Time in hardcover. 'Have you looked in the ballet section?' she asked.

Yes, the library has been critical in my life, too........more so that school, in many ways. Hard to see how it can help many young people now - unless they want to play computer games or look up trash on the internet. The libraries won't be here much longer anyway: another five or ten years of "austerity" should just about do the trick.

I could do with a hardback of A Dance to the Music of Time, too. One of those rare books that really deserves a nice printing and proper binding. Mine has photos from the tv dramatisation, which gets on my nerves a bit: Alan Bennett pulling a rather hammy face as Sillery...........

(Pity about volume 12, however - much the worst in the whole series........)

Dance

I'm in the process of replacing my Flamingo paperbacks, now falling to pieces, with hardcovers. If you don't mind mixing up Little Brown and Heinemann you can do it without breaking the bank. The later copies of both, Temporary Kings onwards, are easily obtainable and priced. The first three in Heinemann, in decent condition, go for prices that will make your eyes water, as does Books do Furnish a Room, for some reason. A complete Heinemann set can cost you more than I paid for my first car. You have to keep reminding yourself you're not a collector and who cares if there are library stamps or inscriptions.

I'm sure, Jane, you're read Powell's To Keep the Ball Rolling, his autobiography in four parts. A must-have for Dance fans.

Can't agree with you on Hearing Secret Harmonies, although I realize lots do.

 

Actually, I haven't read

Actually, I haven't read Powell's autobiography. I was afraid it would pollute the novels. What if there turned out to be an original "Widmerpool"? For much the same reason, I have generally avoided reading too much about Proust........ 

To keep the ball rolling

The autobiogs are as beautifully written as the novels and a fascinating adjunct. Widmerpool remains one of the few complete mysteries, although there are eerie similarities to a certain notorious and prolific G. poster.

A Soggy Banana for Parla

tagalie wrote:

The autobiogs are as beautifully written as the novels and a fascinating adjunct. Widmerpool remains one of the few complete mysteries, although there are eerie similarities to a certain notorious and prolific G. poster.

Perhaps I will have a look........it isn't as if there are that many great books out there. As for this forum's Widmerpool, I can't think who you mean. 

New Speakers Guys

Re Anthony Powell, there is a whole amateur industry out there whose aim it is to find the real life 'character models' who make thinly disguised appearances as Widmerpool, etc. Hugh Moreland is singularly unfortunate here, as he's lumbered with the identity of Constant Lambert, in many ways a very different man. The name of the series is, after all, 'A Dance to the Music of Time' and not "My Friends and Other Animals'.

Meanwhile, most reviewers will tell you that 'Dance' is the reminiscences of an Old Etonian who could only write about toffs. They're wrong too.

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