Brahms' second string sextet

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I don't personally know it

I don't personally know it Socrates. Maybe someone else might do...

Alberni Quartet.

I have the Alberni recording in a reissue form, in the complete Chamber Music by Brahms, on Brilliant. The sound is not that rewarding or revealing, as often happens in these reissues. Perhaps the original CRD recording might be better, at least as a final product.

The Alberni Quartet was a leading and fine group, in this medium, in UK with enough recognition in some other parts of Europe or th US. They produced some very good recordings, mainly in the 70s on CRD, and fewer later on Collins. The Brahms Sextets, as far as I can tell from the reissue I have is a very decent, polished, noble performance. However, I do not find the excitement of the passion and dynamic contrasts of the Slavic groups like Prazak or Talich or the strict authority of the German groups, like the Leipzig Quartet or the Kölner String Sextet. From the British groups, I found the Lindsays as the most daring and, at the same time, refined enouh (the sound is not, however, that well captured).

Parla

parla wrote:

parla wrote:

I have the Alberni recording in a reissue form, in the complete Chamber Music by Brahms, on Brilliant. The sound is not that rewarding or revealing, as often happens in these reissues.  

 

 

... And if you play it "20 or so times" you will detect a deterioration in sound quality too, we are led to believe.

 

Vic.

 

 

 

.

A revelation.

Like a couple of others here, I struggle to warm to Brahms.  With the exception of the Requiem, his music fails to engage me somehow.  But following this thread, I sought these sextets on Qobuz.  I chose the Talich version, but will now follows others' recommendations for alternatives.  Delightful music, both of them.

 

In similar vein, this forum has led me to some now great favourites.  It has helped convert me to Wagner, and has made Bach's Cantatas a highlight of every week's listening.  (The latter aided by Gardiner's recent biography of Bach.  A bit heavy-going for a non-musician, but overall, a most rewarding read.)

 

Let's big up streaming services for allowing the exploration of fresh fields without the necessity of on-spec. purchases.  This, and the guidance of music lovers on this forum has surely led many, like myself, to explore, learn and enjoy.  

 

The difference between others who have taken that journey and are keen to share it, and dry, academic, source-plundered lectures, shines like a candle in a naughty world (to steal someone else's simile!)  And yes, I do know whose, before I'm schooled.

 

Vic.

 

 

 

 

As usual...

As fas you recently reported to us in another thread, Vic, you have to buy CDs for ages, since you are dealing only with streaming services and downloading (when necessary). So, leave to those (apparently few) who still purchase them to find out and experience what (at least some cheap) reissues mean...in the long run.

Parla

 

 

 

VicJayL wrote:

VicJayL wrote:

Like a couple of others here, I struggle to warm to Brahms.  With the exception of the Requiem, his music fails to engage me somehow.  But following this thread, I sought these sextets on Qobuz.  I chose the Talich version, but will now follows others' recommendations for alternatives.  Delightful music, both of them.

 

Nice to hear the thread has served its purpose, to help people discover good music. I’ve myself discovered plenty in these forums, following other people’s pointers. I’ve said it many times before. Brahms is not an easy composer, but insistence pays off handsomely. Although orchestral music in general gets more than its fair share of attention, I believe that Brahms speaks more intimately to us through his chamber music, of which he wrote far more than for orchestra. Plenty more to discover!

Plenty to dicover...only in Brahms's Opus.

"Plenty to discover" indeed, Camaron. Let's see how soon we may embark on his magnificent Lieder, like the unique Two Songs with Viola obbligato, Op.91 or the mature Vier ernste Gesänge, Op.121.

How do you feel about Brahms's Lieder, Camaron?

Parla

 

 

parla wrote:

parla wrote:

"Plenty to discover" indeed, Camaron. Let's see how soon we may embark on his magnificent Lieder, like the unique Two Songs with Viola obbligato, Op.91 or the mature Vier ernste Gesänge, Op.121.

How do you feel about Brahms's Lieder, Camaron?

Parla

I’m not a lieder man myself, and I know very few by anyone. The only one I know by Brahms though are that pair op 91 which are incredibly beautiful. Our friend Chris would be the man for the job, but he certainly seems reticent to join us back!

Thanks Parla about the

Thanks Parla about the Albertini.

Do we know about and what do we think of the recent recording by Quatuor Sine Nomine? The instrumentalists are French and known to me from elsehwere. Any suggestions or recommendations please?

 

Vocal/Choral Brahms.

I thought so, Camaron. However, if you are fond of the Op.91, you can easily try the masterful, quite mature Op. 121 (the Four Serious Songs). They are perfectly sung by both Baritones and Altos/Mezzos. The latter often tend to include the Op. 91 as well in some recitials, like the excellent and emotional enough Marie-Nicole Lemieux, on Analekta.

What about the Choral Works (apart from the monumental Ein Deutsches Requiem)?

Parla

 

 

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