Brahms' second string sextet

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What about them? Not sure

What about them? Not sure what you mean

The garden path

camaron wrote:

What about them? Not sure what you mean

I feel a long list might be coming.........

Reply to #42

I meant, since you are not a Lieder fan, whether you are familiar, not necessarily fan, with the Choral and Vocal Works by Brahms apart from the presumably known to you "A German Requiem".

Parla

Reply to #40.

Socrates, I see you chose a very solid Quartet of the past (Alberni) and a contemporary one, the Sine Nomine. The latter is a Swiss group and a very good one which managed to last for a rather long time (already a substantive positive feature).

They have recorded quite effectively some contemporary and 20th century repertory but also a good number of the classic one. They record predominantly for the very good Swiss label Claves. I have their CDs on Korngold, Pejacevic, Turina and Furtwängler. From the classic repertory, I have their Arriaga disc (excellent) and the String Quintets by Mozart (very interesting but a bit too polished). I have not purchased yet the Brahms Sextets (a release of 2014, on Claves), because I am not convinced that they really excel in the classic repertory. However, if you are interested or you want to give them a try, I am sure they will not let you down. Besides, Claves provides very fine final products. However, why don't you try first the Prazak or Talich (or even Leipzig) Quartets, if you have not yet done so?

Parla

parla wrote:

parla wrote:

I meant, since you are not a Lieder fan, whether you are familiar, not necessarily fan, with the Choral and Vocal Works by Brahms apart from the presumably known to you "A German Requiem".

Parla

 

I feel flattered by your interest Parla. I’ve not been drawn much towards Brahms’ choral music, of which there is a fair amount. I love the German Requiem, like everyone else. Other than that I know the usual suspects, his Nanie op.82, his alto Rhapsody op.53, and his Song of Destiny op.54. They are all very good but and worthy of featuring as numbers of the Requiem, but I find myself listening to them very seldom. I have tried his Thriumphlied Op 55, and this is an interesting work, for unusual and for being his major work, perhaps together with his Rinaldo, that can be counted as a fail. His attempt at making a Haendel-like, pomp and circumstance celebration of the German unification must’ve sound already suspicious back then, and time has not been gentle with it.

Other than that and as far as I know there is, somewhere, an unknown jewel of very different character. I say somewhere because I can’t find it just now, not even a reference. I thought I had the music but can’t find it either, and I don’t have access to my books just now. One of the last things he published, or composed without publication, was a collection of Hungarian songs, that can be sung by choirs or soloists. I’m pretty sure I’ve listened to both. That was his last say in a lifelong aesthetic and personal interest in this sort of non-german popular tradition. They are very short and to the point, and some are really beautiful. But I can’t be more specific just now! If someone knows what I’m talking about it would be nice if they can share the information. I think it could be of interest to some people.

Brahms and Hungary

You cannot be refering to the Hungarian Dances (German: Ungarische Tänze)!!

socratesgwr wrote:

socratesgwr wrote:

You cannot be refering to the Hungarian Dances (German: Ungarische Tänze)!!

No, not them. The Hungarian Dances are Brahms’ most popular music, and not for voices.: piano four hands, although the orchestrations are what you usually hear. This is much later music (and much more obscure), for choir, although it is that sort of hungarian music. For what I remember they are very simple songs, a few of them really uplifting.

More to follow...

O.K. Camaron. I sense that, at a later stage a thread on the Choral and Vocal Music by Brahms might have some good course to follow. By the way, Rinaldo might be a sort of failure as for its popularity, but it is not, in any way, a flop. It is an ambitious work, with some quite well-crafted music for the Tenor soloist and the chorus, but we can discuss this when the right time comes.

Some other very beautiful music of his vocal output is these masterful Vocal Quartets and the unjustly overlooked Motets.

Finally, I trust most of us we know some or all of his Piano Music. So, a potential thread on some of them might be appropriate for the near future, particularly the rather enigmatic, short masterpieces of the last four Piano Opp. 116-119.

We'll see...

Parla

 

Yes, let's not widen the

Yes, let's not widen the thread too much. Brahms’ swan song at the piano deserve its own, or indeed his piano music as a whole, something that I’ve considered in the past. We’ll see!

Here is an afterthought. Some

Here is an afterthought. Some people, who like the sextets but otherwise dont know many of Brahms’ chamber works might wonder what next. My suggestion is that if they like the sextets they will, very likely, enjoy his first string quintet op 88. It is a much later work but in my view very similar in texture and spirit, a very appealing work too.

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