Conductors abuse of power and abuse of others.

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Conductors abuse of power and abuse of others.

Does knowing that the conductor you admire may be a lecherous creep who uses his position to force players and singers to 'perfprm' in other ways effect the way you hear their music? I ask after reading this article: 

https://www.spectator.co.uk/2018/01/the-sex-lives-of-conductors/

It's uncomfortable, and I'm

It's uncomfortable, and I'm not sure how to respond.

I suppose that recordings of the people I know about can go to the charity shop. It doesn't do much for the victims though.

As a general position, I am

As a general position, I am not keen on attaching moral importance to the lives and personalities of artists. There is the work - and you live with that. Once we let our moral judgements bleed into this area, there won't be much room left for art itself. (Though we are heading that way, it seems.........The finger of judgement is doing a lot of pointing at the moment. This person is a racist. That one is sexist. This one made a bad joke about fat people. That one once said something approving of Putin. That one voted against transgender toilets......)

But in the immediate aftermath of a disquieting revelation, I agree it can be a bit off-putting. When you know or at least believe that a certain conductor is a rapist, it can certainly affect the way you feel about their music. That is only human, I suppose.  Eventually, though, I suppose all this stuff fades with time.........Schopenhauer threw his landlady down the stairs, but that doesn't affect my pleasure when I pick up one of his books.

Has anyone out there thrown

Has anyone out there thrown their Robert King CDs out?

The grapes are sour.

Artist stay in History for their achievements only. Their character's behavioural flaws cannot mar the picture of their accomplishments. They may torment their lives and the lives of others but this is none of the business of a pure member of audience.

A good number of the greatest composers had enough flaws so that books about their turbulent lives could be written en masse. However, Mozart or Wagner, to mention only two cases, will always be considered as two of the greatest composers of all times...no matter what. 

Parla

The value of ethics

If one refuses to appreciate a work or performance because of the artist’s personal behavior, that belief should be tolerated, especially if the individual was personally affected in some way.

 

 

I think politicians in general have greater moral responsibilities than artists.  


Me Too!

I think we're largely in agreement on this subject. I too tend to read or listen to a work as being integrated within itself and seperate from the person who created it. Thus I can read 'Journey To The End of The Night' and decide it's a great book, written by an enthusiast for fascism and I find the music of the murderer Gesualdo to be sublime.

Which, of course, doesn't

Which, of course, doesn't mean that I think the behaviour detailed in the article above, as well as that of Robert King, Philip Pickett and the other we have yet to hear about, is anything other than disgusting.

The package.

"Disgusting" or less or not, their flawed behaviour cannot wipe out their artistic reputation in any way. It shows, however, that great art does not come -often- in a nice package. 

Parla

 

Value of fame

Reputation is subjective.

tjh212 wrote:

tjh212 wrote:

Reputation is subjective.

As a matter of fact, it isn't. A reputation is a "social fact": it can be assessed and measured by standard statistical techniques. Some people have a good reputation, some people don't. Fact.

What you mean, I suppose, is that the individual views and opinions which make up the wider reputation are, themselves, subjective. But that is a different matter.

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