Kurt Sanderling

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bernstein

goofyfoot wrote:

The overall intention was to imply that if I were to ask the average American thirty year old who Leonard Bernstein was, I would get a close answer but if I were to ask that same kid about Krips or Furtwangler or possibly even von Karajan, they'd have no idea. In my opinion and from my perspective, there have always been too many artists who receive too little attention and a few by comparison who receive too much.

Surely Bernstein's relative fame is due to West Side Story. Otherwise he'd have no more popular resonance than any other bandmaster. For me it's a great shame, to say the least, that Bernstein chose to conduct Mahler symphonies, which any number of people can do, rather than write more Candides or West Side Storys, which practically nobody else can do. Well nobody else has since.

Mere GM

I do find Bernstein's non New York PO Mahlers to be more appealing - 2nd with Cleveland (broadcast only, presumably), 6th with VPO, 9th with BPO.

 

Since some of our friends are in the Orient, "a non-NY..." recording perhaps can be tolerated.

The "non-NY..." Lenny.

"Some of your friends in the Orient" can also welcome "a non-NY... recording" of dear Lennie (His DG Mahler is highly appreciated by this poster. His Sibelius too, if that matters).

Parla

Mere MM

parla wrote:

...matters

 

M Maeterlinck-inspired Pelleas by Sibelius, I don't think, was recorded by Bernstein, but the music is a great work.  As for the VPO 2nd Symphony, I am also appreciative of Bernstein, over the late Lorin Maazel, but for the 1st, I have preference for the latter.

 

As for "a non ny..." and friends, Sibelius did write a few early piano works with no names, but I don't believe they have been orchestrated.  In any event, his song "Friendship" appears to be an interesting work to study.

Sanderling and more!

I agree, Kurt Sanderling is an outstanding conductor, I only discovered him about a year or so ago (I had known his work for long but never "linked up") and upon listening carefully was stunned by what I heard. I have a wonderful Tchaikovsky 4 on LP with him, plus Shostakovich 5 and Bruckner 7, all with depth and real symphonic music making. The Berlin Radio Symph Orch isn't that great in my view but he shines through as a conductor. 

 

Another neglected musician is Sandor Vegh - previously mentioned in this forum. His late output as a conductor is wonderful, wonderful! You can get Mozart collections conducted by him for very little, worth every penny and more!

 

I used to be a great fan of Lenny and still admire a lot of what he did but tend to avoid most of his later recordings.

 

Maybe I'm alone in this, but it takes a lot to get me into a concert these days, most conductors active today (bar very few) are not very inspiring in my view. I've been spoiled by too many outstanding concerts a quarter century ago and before.

FF

ganymede,

 

F. Fricsay's Berlin RSO recordings, recently reissued en masse, do show the orchestra with much intensity (indeed, he was not one of "these days" conductors either - a "one of these days", may be).

 

Which concerts of the past did you find most memorable?

ganymede wrote:

ganymede wrote:

Maybe I'm alone in this, but it takes a lot to get me into a concert these days, most conductors active today (bar very few) are not very inspiring in my view. I've been spoiled by too many outstanding concerts a quarter century ago and before.

Behold the final defeat of the classical composer. He was crushed in the mid 20th century by the rise of the conductor; Karajan's 5th, Solti's 6th, Kleiber's 7th etc. With the demise of those giants, the humble composer must surely come back into his own. But, to judge from the above, it would seem he hasn't.

Revival
guillaume wrote:

With the demise of those giants, the humble composer must surely come back into his own. But, to judge from the above, it would seem he hasn't.

As the reissue machine cranks, you would think, so the crush continues due to CD weight. (In the Karajan 5th case, that's 150+ times, including concerts).

Toscanini

Funny that Toscanini hasn't been mentioned as a giant. He cerainly benefited from radio broadcasts and a certain amount of media coverage. I see the later Toscanini years as lens of what would then become of Bernstein and von Karajan. All three became household names in the USA though von Karajan carried a stigma due to his Nazi affiliations but Toscanini and Bernstein symbolized the heretical as America's symbol of tolerance, prosperity and freedom. Those were certainly the 'golden years'!

Getting back to Sanderling and Vegh, these are musicians, musicians or artists, artists. And not to take credit away from the three greats mentioned above (my favorite Toscanini) but there was in no way a thought through attempt to make either Sandeling or Vegh into household names. Sometimes the best career move an artist can make is to die.

goofyfoot

Careers

Bernstein: "I have become real good friends with von Karajan. My first Nazi" - p. 379

gf: "Toscanini and Bernstein symbolized the heretical as America's symbol of tolerance, prosperity and freedom" - not sure if Toscanini can be associated with tolerance and freedom, but I wonder if he would tolerate his records via (free) streaming?

"Sometimes the best career move an artist can make is to die" - vissi d'arte... (The opera is in the conductor's name, and she does die by moving ("body downward"), after all - perhaps for the HvK detractor, she can attach some Karajan CD weights)

"Within minutes the place was surrounded by police" - Karajan recording Tosca's firing squad scene, 1962 Sofiensaal (p. 494)

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