Mozart's String Quintets

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Boccherini - M. Haydn.

Actually, these "Quintets" are nice (maybe not that fine) music, but I would not put them even in the same league as Boccherini's also primordial but quite inventive, at least at times, and well-crafted Quintets (with two violas or two celli).

As for M. Haydn's Requiem(s). The more known and more often recorded in c minor exist(ed) in a impressive recording with some Berlin forces under Werner Ehrhardt, on Capriccio (in SACD), along with one of his Masses (Sancti Joannis) and a short Te Deum. There is also a quite decent recording onMDG with the Lausanne Chamber Orchestra under C. Zacharias.

There is also another Requiem in B flat, not that interesting as the one in c minor, that has been recorded by H. rilling for Haenssler and, more recently, in a better recording by the Mannheim Chamber P.O. under Georg Grun, on Carus.

In any case, not a major figure to spend too much time on his entire work.

However, he was a good teacher, apparently. Among those who profitted from his teachings, knowledge and even influence were Weber, Diabelli, Neukomm...

Parla

Bruckner's Mass(es).

Well, it is O.K., camaron, since, at least, it is an interesting "diversion".

As for Bruckner's Mass in f minor, I guess none could disagree with Jane's enthusiasm. I would not exactly put it in the same league as Beethoven and Schubert's Great ones, but it is a very substantive work in this genre.

There are two very impressively recorded SACD versions: one in Pentatone with Janowski with his Berlin forces and another one with Ticciati and the Bamberg S.O., on Tudor. For a more Classic recording but with a more compromised sound, you can always go back to Jochum, on DG. Celibidache is on a league of his own: a very personal, very special and quite brilliant one, but let's live it for another post (or possibly a separate thread).

His Second Mass in e minor is quite appealing to me (an intimate Bruckner!). There is a very fine recording, on Hanssler, with Marcus Creed and his Stutgart Ensemble. Try it.

Parla

Haydn's Masses and a bit more.

I would certainly suggest that you, at least, try to explore, as much as you can, the more mature last six Masses, namely from Hob.XXII:9 up to 14, plus at least the Stabat Mater and the Choral version of The Seven Last Words. All these are well crafted works of a much greater scale and scope than most of the Masses and choral works of composers of his time and beyond. I give you some indicative recordings:

- No. 9 "Paukenmesse" or "Missa in Tempore Belli": either Bernstein, on DG, or Hickox, on Chandos.

- No. 10 "Heiligmesse": I prefer Rilling on Haenssler but Gardiner, on Philips, is a solid, solemn and strong performance, well produced.

- No. 11 "Nelson Mass": Although you know it, try to listen the latest quite impressive recording by Linn with Boston Baroque under Martin Pearlman. A great disc.

- No. 12 "Theresienmesse": Gardiner has a stronger presence here than Hickox.

- No. 13 "Schopfungmesse": I prefer the unique atmosphere of die Frauenkirche Dresden recording by Carus with the Dresden forces under Robert Kreile.

- No. 14 "Harmonienmesse": Maris Jansons in his "Live" recording on BR Klassik, in excellent SACD production, is quite convincing. Harnoncourt is also impressive but, the recent reissues are rather poor.

- Stabat Mater: Pinnock, on Archiv, or Harnoncourt, in the poor reissue(s) of Warner.

- The Seven Last Words: Accentus, on Naive, Harnoncourt, on Warner, and Ferencsik, on Hungaroton (great performance, not so impressive recording).

I hope it may be of some help, Camaron.

Parla

Since we are at the

Since we are at the digression part of this thread, allow me to tell you that buddhism does not lead to anything but a concealed but quite strong ego. Ask me. I have some very personal experiences.

As for Celibidache, the man was great enough so that one may overlook this kind of isolated incidents or the difficulties or eccentricities resulted from his unique personality. His spirit and knowledge of Music go much beyond our sensitivities. Likewise with Wagner (and this unnecessary connection with Nazi. They chose his Music, as they did with Beethoven's!).

Parla

Thanks Parla,

Thanks Parla,

I'm aware of his late mases. My questions was more about a personal recommendation on what mass to go for after the Nelson mass. I'll keep in mind the Boston Baroque recording though, now I remember having heard good things about it.

 

 

parla wrote: allow me to tell

parla wrote:

allow me to tell you that buddhism does not lead to anything but a concealed but quite strong ego

 

Would't surprise me a bit.

Who is the buddhist?

I sense that you misunderstood me. I'm not buddhist. My Chinese wife and quite a few friends, relatives (from my wife's side), people I have to work with here etc. are...

Parla

Where to start?

Start with the "Paukenmesse" and indulge in each one of them, one after the other. You may find the journey quite rewarding. Musically, these are magnificent works.

Don't miss The Seven Last Words (it is interesting to listen to all four forms of this work, one after the other: Piano, String Quartet, Orchestra and the Choral one).

Parla

parla wrote:

parla wrote:

I sense that you misunderstood me. I'm not buddhist. My Chinese wife and quite a few friends, relatives (from my wife's side), people I have to work with here etc. are...

Parla

 

I didn't misunderstood you Parla, not sure why you thought so.  I didn't think you were refering to yourself.

parla wrote:

parla wrote:

Start with the "Paukenmesse" and indulge in each one of them, one after the other. You may find the journey quite rewarding. Musically, these are magnificent works.

Don't miss The Seven Last Words (it is interesting to listen to all four forms of this work, one after the other: Piano, String Quartet, Orchestra and the Choral one).

Parla

 

The Paukenmesse then. Thant's more like it.

I know the Seven Last Words, the string quartet and the choral version.

Thanks!

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