Qobuz and Gramophone

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Parla

Parla

Of course you've got a point, I don't think even Vic would deny that. But I do think streaming will offer a sensible long-term alternative to ownership. We're currently in its very early stages, and companies will come and go. In, say, three years time, things will settle down. In the meantime, some of us are prepared to dip a toe in the water and spend a few quid on it. I do admit, though, that the loss of Chandos, if it does prove permanent, will be a bit of a hammer blow for Qobuz. I can just about live with them not having Hyperion, but they need more of the smaller interesting labels.

Streaming

Indeed as Parla says, streaming appears to be ephemeral so perhaps that why I haven't embraced it. You have something you may want to hear again and it's not there. Of course some of us may be obsessive collectors.....

Paul.

You do have a point, Paul. By all means, streaming is a viable -and legitimate-alternative, as long as it remains an option. The problem -and it is going to be a big one- is if and when this option becomes the "future" of listening to music, practically eliminating any source of ownership and any form of physical product.

If this ever happens, quite a few changes in the recording business, music meritocracy, competition, quality of sound (SACD, Blue Ray) etc. have to take place to an extent that, at least to some of us, the then emerged situation seems quite precarious and uncertain. This fear goes beyond the "obssesive" sense of collection of "some of us" (as 33lp smartly put it).

Parla

P.S.: Paul, from what I have noticed from our exchanges so far, apart from Hyperion (and Chandos now), Linn, ECM and few other major independent labels are not there. I am sure that most of the Far-East (or other regions) labels should not be there (or at least a great deal of their catalogue), plus quite a few smaller companies with some very interesting collectibles (BeArTon, CD Accord, NoMadMusic etc.).

the value of Qobuz

BBC Music Magazine Composer of the Month featured Schumann in the latest edition, and as usual gave a list of recommended recordings.  Thanks to Qobuz I was able to listen to all of them: Piano Concerto with Leif Ove Andsnes, BPO, Jansons (EMI); Fantasie in C, Pollini (DG); Symphonies, Sawallishch I have from recommendations here); and Frauenliebe und Leben, Anne Sofie von Otter (DG).

All wonderful listenings, and I'm sure some would want to buy them as a result.  I won't because they are always there to come back to should I wish. Since signing up I have enjoyed music that I would never have purchased, that would never have crossed my radar, but that I am the richer for having experienced. 

The ownership of physical objects confers a satisfaction that has little to do with the experience I describe.  That the future lies with instant streaming is undeniable, I would have thought.

 

I must say that with the

I must say that with the Gramophone Award winners announced, I'm very glad to be subscribing to Qobuz.  I'll certainly continue to buy downloads from Hyperion and other small labels, and perhaps some CD bargain set, but I'm happy to be doing most of my listening via Qobuz.  

 

The real worry is if there are enough people who care about the higher quality to enable them to survive.  But here's hoping...

 

Chris

Satisfaction: a stone dangerously rolling...

Of course, a service (access) cannot "confer" the same satisfaction vis a vis the "ownership of a physical object". Some people prefer to lease a house or a car, some to own them. However, one can imagine the dangers of the lack of choices.

Besides, for the time being, the services provided by streaming companies (like those of leasing a house or car) rely on access to physical products (recordings made by specific labels), that have to exist (to be purchased, reviewed, got their artistic value, established the status of a certain performer or group etc.). So, thankfully, some folks outhere (in a great part of the world) are going to buy these "physical objects" that labels, performers, producers and people who really love this Music can still offer...

Parla

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a classic piece of Parla logic, clutching to the most tenuous of arguments to be proved in the right on every subject.  It is pursued to such lengths in this case, because he is an avid collector of CDs ("100 - 140 per month") and does not himself use a streaming service, so it must not only be inferior, but dangerous!

 

 

parla wrote:

 Some people prefer to lease a house or a car, some to own them. However, one can imagine the dangers of the lack of choices.

 

 

Non sequitur.   

 

 

parla wrote:

 Besides, for the time being, the services provided by streaming companies (like those of leasing a house or car) rely on access to physical products (recordings made by specific labels), that have to exist (to be purchased, reviewed, got their artistic value, established the status of a certain performer or group etc.).

 

 

No, it is not "access to the physical object" (a piece of plastic), it is access to what precedes it, the recording - which can be reviewed, purchased and distributed in digital form, independent of any physical object.

 

The benefits or dangers to our access to music are determined by the economics of marketing that music - whatever the medium.  It certainly does not rely on one medium, the CD.

 

Stand by for the next bit of self-justifying nonsense.

Bits
Access to the recording...Which one and how?

Vic, the access to the recordings specific commercial labels make were, have been and are meant for using them in the form of a final product, which is for sale. So, the streaming companies, at least for now, provide access to products we know, not to mere recordings, even if they have access to the mastertapes (which I doubt).

In the same vein, the clients, reviewers, even the artists themselves rely on this plastic final product (of variable quality based on the recording venue, engineering, material of the final product etc.). Also, the announcement of any new recording has to do with the release of a final product of a certain quality (cheap reissue, CD of different quality, Limited Edition, SACD, Audio Blu ray etc.).

Of course, we do not know what is in store for us. Possibly, we might not need labels in the future. Maybe, not even recordings...at least as we know them. 

Parla

parla wrote:

parla wrote:

Vic, the access to the recordings specific commercial labels make were, have been and are meant for using them in the form of a final product, which is for sale. So, the streaming companies, at least for now, provide access to products we know, not to mere recordings, even if they have access to the mastertapes (which I doubt).

I don't follow what you mean - I presume the site we are discussing is offering streaming media that is being supplied to them at CD quality or better by the recording company. 

 

Ted

 

 

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