Qobuz and Gramophone

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..."Rosebud"...

A bit of obsession with Parla is always expected from you, Vic.

I just recapitulated and even repeated comments and views expressed by other members here (along with mine), but I...keep responding...I can understand your reaction.

By the way, I admire your imagination. I really enjoyed the reference to Citizen Cane. Utterly entertaining as almost most of the rest of your post (with your beloved salami tactics).

Anyway, as Paul wisely said streaming is here to stay and it is in its infancy. Time will tell...what the (and its) future may be.

Parla

VicJayL wrote:

VicJayL wrote:

Yes, we've read this before.  I think he means the booklet.  What else can a bit of plastic "do"?

 

It can be played wherever and whenever you want and

won't expire if the recording company folds. 

 

Streaming is the perfect solution if you want to explore. It is a workable, but

 not necessarily a perfect solution in all cases, for keeping things. 

 

 

Ted

 

 

Touchy

VicJayL wrote:

Spooky!

 

Mere shadows do have sense of touch.

 

parla wrote:

I hope...we won't sleep in virtual beds

 

VicJayL wrote:

But I am reminded of...El Dorado...

Allowing the streaming service company executives to sleep easier at night, no doubt.

 

http://lowres.cartoonstock.com/literature-hansel-witch-house-sweet-cd-tr...

 

 

TedR wrote:

It can be played wherever and whenever you want and

won't expire if the recording company folds.

 

Streaming is the perfect solution if you want to explore. It is a workable, but

not necessarily a perfect solution in all cases, for keeping things.

 

True.  For non-critical recordings, expiration is perhaps acceptable. 

Some other voices.

From those few who can have some reservations about the "new facility", you may check an article on the Telegraph by the retired clarinetist Jeremy Wilson titled "Spotify is ruining the way we listen to classical music" (Feb. 28, 2013 last updated: http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/technology/jeremy wilson2/100008881/spotify-is-ruining-t...).

Some interesting points made there: "owing nothing and having access to everything is becoming the norm"..."the loss of ownership cheapens our relationship with recorded music"..."in a world of unlimited choice, what does one listen to?"..."Music is given meaning by the way it was consumed...a notion of time and place has been integral to any listening activity"..."By stripping away these rituals, the whole enterprise of listening has become shallow. Skipping a track after 30 seconds is guilt-free when an entire lexicon is sitting there, waiting to be discovered"...The opportunity to bond with a recording has gone. The more we search, the less value we attribute"..."Time to face the consequences of wanting everything and wanting it now".

To whom it may concern.

Parla

Voices

Further analysis is desirable on how the ritual of CD insertion or the satisfaction of jewel boxes on display affect the evaluation of a work or a recording (and the experience), if the sound quality is the same as non-CD sources.

'Wanting everything and

'Wanting everything and wanting it now' could also be applied though to the more general culture in our society of buying everything online at very cheap prices, including CDs. It could also be applied to the everything should be free mentality of those who download illegally (which, sorry to say, is almost the norm these days outside this forum).

 

Ted

 

parla wrote:

parla wrote:

 ...The opportunity to bond with a recording has gone. The more we search, the less value we attribute"..."Time to face the consequences of wanting everything and wanting it now".

 

Yes, terrible things happen when you give people the freedom to choose.  It's like universal literacy leading to millions reading trash, and the ending of hunger leading to all this obesity.  Freedom of choice should be limited to those like us who know how to use it properly, shouldn't it?

 

It's just this kind of elitist clap-trap that has reduced this forum to six of us talking to each other.

As an experiment, I listened

As an experiment, I listened to three different versions of Winterreise: by Peter Schreier, a CD bought some years ago; by Gerald Finley, a download purchased from Hyperion; and by Jonas Kauffman, streamed from Qobuz.  Differences in performance aside, I didn't notice any difference in my bonding experience with each.

 

There are valid concerns about how new classical music is to be paid for but these sort of arguments don't really help.

 

Streaming won't go away, but high quality streaming could well disappear if not enough people are prepared to pay a premium for such services.

Noise

I think in the soft passages you can hear the CD spinning...

 

VicJayL wrote:

...all this obesity

 

Fat and obesive are part of fatuous and obsessive overnourishment.

Jeremy Wilson wrote, by the way.

This time, Mr. Jeremy Wilson "wrote" the aforesaid quotes in The Telegraph. I chose only few quotes from his article, in case some of you might not read it.

As for your comment, Vic: In market economy, "freedom to choose" is a great luxury to allow. Business forces, being indifferent whether monopoly or oligopoly or any other side-effect may occur, simply guide (see manipulate) the needs of the potential customers. Just one has to notice the craziness just happened with the new "device" of a major American company of electronics.

In this vein, the article of Mr. J. Wilson refers to the potential, if not exisitng, danger of creating another oligopoly (at the moment) of leading people to listen to a difficult and demanding form of Art, like Classical Music, in a way that can strip it from the necessary preparation and approach for its proper understanding, evaluation and bond with the respective artist(s), recording(s) and production ("in a world of unlimited choice, what does one listen to?"). By "surfing" in a cornucopia of recordings from here and there, can one find his/her safe way to the great artisic achievements of the past, present and future in this field? Or can he/she ever find the way to superb, meticulous recordings from minor labels, unknown performers (unsung heroes), local productions of limited promotion and so on?

Parla

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