Sleep

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Sleep

 

I am sure I am not alone in being intrigued by the work of Max Richter. I was interested without being overwhelmed by his reworking ('recomposition') of The Four Seasons, but the more I hear Sleep the more impressed I am by it.

 

It's 8 hours long in its full version (although there is a version of a more manageable length on DG) and is, without putting too fine a point on it, designed to put the listener to sleep. For obvious reasons, I haven't heard it all yet (this isn't music to listen to when you're tired, believe me), but within the soporific constraints he's set himself, there is some extremely intelligent work to get to grips with.

 

Just a shame it'll probably be some time before I manage to hear the entire thing.

Until today, I'd never heard

Until today, I'd never heard a single thing by Max Richter, though I'd obviously come across his name from time to time......

I had a briefish listen to Sleep on Spotify this morning. There's an album of what must be excerpts called "From Sleep", split into 8 tracks. I liked everything I heard and will give it a full listen this week. I suspect it will be a bit "minimalist" for some, but I have days when I like that sort of thing.......

 

 

Jane - thanks for your response.

Surprised you hadn't heard of Max R: Sleep was broadcast live last year in its entirety on Radio 3 and (I don't think I'm imaging this) got into the record books as the longest live classical music concert ever broadcast. I am still impressed with how the musicians and sound engineers managed to stay awake until the end...

But you're right about 'From Sleep' - it's a one hour rattle through the full eight hour version. Both are recorded on DG: http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/gb/cat/4795267

http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/gb/cat/4795257


And good luck with the 'full listen'!

 

 

Sleepless with "Sleep".

I'm sure you're  not alone in being intrigued by Max Richter's "Sleep", Craig. I can tell you that he has his fans in Far East. However, almost all of them belong to the outsiders of the Classical Music realm. In this way, I can state that I am not at all interested in this sort of mixed bag music and, definitely, in music that supposedly may lead you to...sleep (from few minutes of this "sleep" thing I listened to from the DG site and Youtube, I felt that I could stay awake all night. It was so frighteningly monotonous...).

I guess even someone who can love this music needs some "good luck" along with enough courage and stamina to go all the way through the very end. 

Parla

Is Parla's name Wei-Chin Chen

Is Parla's name Wei-Chin Chen? There is a noticable similarity of tone (the self-regard and tendency to boast) as that displayed in a letter published from that gentelman in the May issue of Gramophone.

Faux pas?

No, dear Arbutus, I am not and, as I have stated on various occasions, I am not even Chinese. I am European but with a Chinese wife. Any similarity with any other contributor (even Asian) to this publication is purely coincidental.

Welcome back anyway (if you really return).

Parla

parla wrote:...from few

parla wrote:

...from few minutes of this "sleep" thing I listened to from the DG site and Youtube, I felt that I could stay awake all night. It was so frighteningly monotonous...).

 

Of course I didnt expect someone with your musical ignorance and prejudice to be receptive to contemporary music. This remark is akin to someone listening to 'a few minutes' of Götterdämmerung and concluding it was not for them.


parla wrote:I can tell you

parla wrote:

I can tell you that he has his fans in Far East. However, almost all of them belong to the outsiders of the Classical Music realm.

You say that like it's a bad thing...

Audio Editor, Gramophone

Nothing bad or good about it.

I didn't say it "like it's a bad thing", Andrew. I simply stated it as an observation to reckon with.

Parla

A contemporary lullaby for receptive listeners.

Your comment is interesting, Craig. I thought that great music can overcome "musical ignorance and prejudice" and win through. I always believed that this is the essence of the great Art. In any case, I did not say that this music is not worthy but rather it failed to put me to...sleep, if that was the intention of the composer ("the listeners should slumber peacefully throughout. "My personal lullaby for a frenetic world" etc.).

Besides, the "few minutes" meant that I listened to a certain degree of time to see how engaged (either by making me sleepy or musically) I might be with the narrative of this epic work. 

I liked the apt comparison with "Gotterdammerung". It is true that few minutes from the beginning of the Third Day's Music Drama of the Wagnerian epic work might mislead some listeners. However, few bars from the start of Die Walkure might put them, rather easily, on track, leading them (maybe not in three days) to the very end of Gotterdammerung.

Anyway, I am sure you'll find a good deal  of intelligent things in this work, whenever you may manage to get all the way through.

Parla

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