Tchaikovsky's The Seasons

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Tchaikovsky's The Seasons

 

Hi All,

 

It has been years since I last visited the forum to engage in discussion on the joys of the great art that we call classical music;  in fact, the site has changed completely, and it was necessary for me to re-create my login details.  So, while I may appear to be a newcomer, that's not entirely true.

 

The development of my young son, now eight years of age, has invigorated my passion for classical music, and I find myself rediscovering my love for composers, pieces, performers and recordings. 

 

The process of introducing my son to this beautiful artform is magical and it is great to play a role, however small, in contributing to the future of classical music. As I sit here typing, I hear him at the piano, learning Kabalevsky's Youth Concerto, and I am moved to tears.

 

Apologies for the long introduction, friends.  Other than simply saying hello, the purpose of my post is this - Thanks to YouTube, I recently discovered Tchaikovsky's June (Barcarolle) and November (Troika) pieces, and have fallen in love with them, particularly Valentina Lisitsa's performances.  Who here is similarly moved by these pieces?  Also, can anyone please point me in the direction of a score for Troika that includes pedal markation?

 

Kind regards,

 

Spring

 

 

 

 

Yes, I love those pieces, the

Yes, I love those pieces, the whole collection if fact. I’ve known them for many years, and it is one of the few things by Tchaikovsky that has survived time and I still listen to and enjoy. To me they belong to a kind of music that seems almost modest and unassuming but it reaches far beyond it might look. I would put Brahms’ last piano pieces in that category. I also think they both share a very poignant feeling of nostalgy. They’ve both touched, in different ways, on the passing of time and, in in doing so, they’ve become timeless...

So, thanks for the reminder, I’m now playing them, and they are very perfect music for a cold winter morning, the first morning of yet another year.

You can get the whole score

You can get the whole score at http://imslp.org/wiki/The_Seasons,_Op.37a_(Tchaikovsky,_Pyotr)

There are several versions. The first one has both fingering and pedal markings throughout, though there are no pedal markings for Troika......It could be an omission, but perhaps not. Good luck anyway. It looks like a seriously tricky piece to play at full pace.

IMSLP, if you don't know it, is free and legal (in most countries). They simply gather together copies of scores which have outrun their copyright. You can get just about anything that is 100 years old or more.

That link doesn't seem to

That link doesn't seem to work! Anyway, just type imslp Tchaikovisky Seasons into google and that will take you there........

 

 

So glad to hear that you share my enjoyment of this beautiful music, Camaron.  Valentina plays them wonderfully in my opinion, so if you haven't seen the videos on YouTube, do check them out.  I'd love to hear your suggestions on the Brahms pieces, by the way, particularly where they can be played by an enthusiastic eight year old. The limiting factor is hand size, but other than that, he's coping pretty well.  I love the rumbling of the left hand in Troika, by the way;  the sound is mesmerizing.

 

camaron wrote:

Yes, I love those pieces, the whole collection if fact. I’ve known them for many years, and it is one of the few things by Tchaikovsky that has survived time and I still listen to and enjoy. To me they belong to a kind of music that seems almost modest and unassuming but it reaches far beyond it might look. I would put Brahms’ last piano pieces in that category. I also think they both share a very poignant feeling of nostalgy. They’ve both touched, in different ways, on the passing of time and, in in doing so, they’ve become timeless...

So, thanks for the reminder, I’m now playing them, and they are very perfect music for a cold winter morning, the first morning of yet another year.

Thank you, Jane, for sharing

Thank you, Jane, for sharing the IMSLP link.

 

Great to see all of this beautiful music in the public domain.

 

We have found this piece challenging - particularly where the melody moves to the left hand and the accompaniment switches to the right - but with repetition and segmentation, we're getting there.

 

Is it common for composers or edition editors to ommit pedal markings (presmably leaving this open to musician's interpretation)?

 

Happy New Year to all.

 

Spring

 

janeeliotgardiner wrote:

You can get the whole score at http://imslp.org/wiki/The_Seasons,_Op.37a_(Tchaikovsky,_Pyotr)

There are several versions. The first one has both fingering and pedal markings throughout, though there are no pedal markings for Troika......It could be an omission, but perhaps not. Good luck anyway. It looks like a seriously tricky piece to play at full pace.

IMSLP, if you don't know it, is free and legal (in most countries). They simply gather together copies of scores which have outrun their copyright. You can get just about anything that is 100 years old or more.

My suggestions in terms of

My suggestions in terms of actual pieces or recordings? If you don’t know them, they are his Op. 116 to 119. Just start with his three pieces op 117 and you’ll see what I mean. Then follow with his op. 118. I’ve no idea how hard or easy they are to play, but I would imagine that mostly they are not hard, technically.

 

If you mean recordings…. Kempf, Joao Pires and Radu Lupu have all played all or some of this pieces nicely. I’m sure they’ll be many more, but my choice is Glenn Gould. He has a recording with Brahms' early ballads and a selection of these late intermezzi which I find exceptional. If you know and don’t like Gould (not a rare thing...) don’t be put off by it, this is the most un-Gould recording he ever made, of a repertoire that, at first sight, seems totally alien to him.

I will listen to Valentina, thanks for the suggestion.

I see from your other post

I see from your other post that you know and like Gould....

spring3r wrote: Is it common

spring3r wrote:

Is it common for composers or edition editors to ommit pedal markings (presmably leaving this open to musician's interpretation)?

I have seen other scores for Troika with pedal markings. You can get an idea of them from the first page of the score, if you search for "sheet music" and click on Images. You can then get the first page as a free view from several online publishers. 

Whether these are composer markings or editorial markings, I don't know. My guess would editorial. Some composers put them in, some don't. The first such composer markings come from Beethoven, I believe..........so absolutely none before that. After that, it is often hard to say just who is responsible for pedal markings........

camaron wrote:

camaron wrote:

My choice is Glenn Gould......

I think that's a pretty eccentric choice for late Brahms..........even for a Gould lover. But they are good recordings, especially when you consider the variable quality of Gould's non-Bach stuff.

My choice, for opus 118 and 119, would be Murray Perahia. I have lots of other versions, including Lupu, but I really find it hard to listen to anyone else after Perahia. He seems to get everything right.

janeeliotgardiner wrote:

janeeliotgardiner wrote:

 

 

 

I think that's a pretty eccentric choice for late Brahms..........even for a Gould lover.

Not at all. This recording is a very well known one for those who love these late pieces by Brahms, and I’m the first one to be amazed that Glenn Gould did something like that. Gould creates a very un-gould feeling to the music: one of spontaneous and improvised meditation, and it just captures it beautifully. Nothing sounds calculated or whimsical. If I remember correctly, Gould didn’t know the music before recording it, he read it first time on the first day of recording, I think… But whatever, don’t take my word for it...

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