"The Music as a human right"?!

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RE: "The Music as a human right"?!

Goofyfoot, this article on "nuts and bolts" on the subject has already been brought to our attention by Socrates (page 3, #10, Jan.27). Unfortunately, it does cover only the rights of the Musicians, not what happened after they have made use of them, i.e. with the actual "product" of their activity or profession. Most importantly, this article relies all these "rights" of the musicians on two existing and recognised human rights: the freedom of expression and the right to participate in the cultural life of a society.

However, I have seen, even in Berlin, skillful violinists performing Bach's Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin, in very cold nights and outside in the streets, receiving the indifference of those passing-by and expecting few cent or single Euros (in the best case). So, the question remains: Is Music really necessary for our life, so that one can pursue it as a quest for recognising it as a human right for the mankind?

Parla

RE: "The Music as a human right"?!

I think the "paradox", Tjh, is that you insist on pursuing the same issue for too long.

As you may know, fortunately, it is not yet the case where all orchestras fall and the concerts I may choose are not exclusively dealing with Symphonic Music. There are still quite a few interesting Chamber Music festivals and concerts as well as Instrumental ones, Choral etc. plus the ones (small in scale, of course) I may organise or contribute to their realisation. Besides, this is only a small fraction of what I pursue as my involvement in Classical Music. The rest is predominantly a very personal and solitary exercise (listening to my extensive and constantly updated collection, reading and watching relevant programs and other audio-visual products etc.).

So, is it a bit more clear now?

Parla

RE: "The Music as a human right"?!

Thanks to you as well, Tjh. We might end up on "different pages", but not too far apart, I hope.

Still, allow me some final (hopefully) points as a response to your last post:

- Of course, there can be others to "blame" for e.g. the fall of a Symphony Orchestra, i.e. mismanagement, adverse circumstances, whatever...However, the role of the relevant institutions (specialised schools, television and radio stations etc.), the big companies or influential individuals (who normally can play the critical role of the main sponsors), governements which can guide, promote and incite the interest of the public (and the potential sponsors) through education, programs etc. can play a critical role in the development of the Music.

- When I mentioned the "concerts I choose", I never meant it is "totally" up to me. I may not have all the choices of the world, but, we are not yet at the time of the end of Music. 

(Your "privilege" of posting to Gramophone is a contractual right between you and the esteemed magazine. It is not a personal quest to achieve something and get a better person, in any way). 

So, we may come to this-

Of course, protection of Music cannot be by force, since it does not constitute an established human right.

The value of Music does not and cannot involve any form of protection (it is not a directly relevant issue). The development, the fate of Music involves the protection of it (as in any other issue related to development, fate etc.)

Parla

RE: "The Music as a human right"?!

I can concur with your "final thought", Tjh. However, I have seen some "miracles" to the effet you refer to. In some of them, I contributed a bit...

Very pleased that "Music can bring us closer", anyhow...

Parla

RE: "The Music as a human right"?!

Sorry for missing this opportunity, Tjh. However, if the ticket for the Manderling concert is not too pricey and they have in the program Mendelssohn or Shostakovich (or even Schubert), go for it. You won't regret it.

All the best, anyway.

Parla

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