Vintage gramophones to copies

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Vintage gramophones to copies

Hello folks

 

I looking for a Gramophone for my cafe. I have a record player but I just love the old Gramophones! Now I have done some research and it sure does not look easy!! I understand the different types of Gramophone such as a cylinder phonograph, horned gramophones, table and floor standing to cabinet gramophones and portable ones. I particularly like the horned gramophones. HMV to pathe and columbia models I have come across, sure there are plenty more. The reason I joined this forum is because from my research it seems there are indeed ALOT of fakes out there...but I am also aware that the real deal given that they are pretty rare are VERY expensive! however If I want to play my beloved records on them I do not want them ruined! And from what I can tell cheap fakes will tear my records to shreds! I would like one that places both sizes of records. I also read that the needles need changing ALOT.... I have read about the indian fakes. And brass as a material is of course expensive. So as a starting point are some replicas ok? I dont mind if its a good company making replicas...and it still plays decent. And which ones out of the four types I have mentioned the easiet to manage/maintain... and tips on them really? I am happy to pay an adequete price if it means I get a decent one! Tips on antique ones would also come in handy! thanks!

I would say that you need to

I would say that you need to think about what you want and the practicalities.

As far as I know cylinders are insufficiently available for this to be a sensible option.

Do you mean a vintage gramophone playing 78s?

If so, you will have the issues of surface noise, wearing out ancient recordings and you will need a member of staff on almost permanent record changing duty. If you have one with an accoustic horn, the power may not be sufficient for a public place like a cafe.

A lp player will give better quality and only need the records changing every 20 minutes or so.

I would be inclined to have a nice display gramophone in the corner, but a more modern music system discreetly playing whatever sort of music fits the ambience of your cafe, while the staff get on with providing high quality food with cheerful service.

Best wishes

P

Gramophones

Hi P

 

Thanks for your response! yeah i am a only a novice when it comes to these things! And I now realise I cannot play my 33's and 45's thats for SURE!! I do actually have some 78's not many though so would not be great to keep playing the same old...and very good point you made about the staff.... they will be too busy to keep changing every two mins and will hate me ! haha ! I know a record fair that sells 78's and you get get online.... My friend has also kindly offered to give me some... I have had a rethink about how a gramophone could fit into the cafe....I think for the reasons you stated ... my ordinary speaker system will be the main cafes music outlet, makes sense. But I was thinking to have an evening for the gramophone and ask people to bring their 78's ... might only be two people haha! but Id love to have one. I have a mixture of stuff in the cafe and I have some victorian items and so for the daytime it would be nice for display for sure. It seems the cyclinder gramophone is out the question... I've been looking at Replica RCA Victor phonograph gramophones for sale, do you know anything about those? The pics don't look too bad! here is a link:

 

http://www.for-sale.ie/phonograph-gramophone

 

see what you think ... sounds alright! and for the look is what I am after! 

Real vintage gramophones

The difference between a vintage gramophone and a replica can be outstanding. Back then designers took every effort to create machines that would sound good. It was not merely the case of sticking a few parts together and hoping for the best. Victor and HMV introduced a new type of acoustic gramophone in the mid 1920's. This used maths to work out the length and diameter of the internal horn needed to give the new records the chance of being heard properly.

Horn gramophones,that is the type with an external horn,should never be used to play any record made after,say,1930,and especially not the plastic 78's made in the 1950's. The sound boxes on them are too inflexible. If you do get a vintage model try to get one with an internal horn,and with a sound box capable of using semi-permanent needles. You may have to change records every 3 or 4 minutes but the fiddly task of changing needles is reduced.

As regards volume,don't be fooled. Using a loud tone needle the acoustic output from a gramophone can fill a small hall. I once knew a chap who owned several gramophones,including a big HMV floor standing model and that sounded delightful and could rattle the window!

Not all 78's were made the same. The early ones used a variety of groove size,which is why 78 fans use a number of stylii to play back. A stylus whichsounds good on a 1950's 78 will not on one made 25 years earlier,and when these old records are played back correctly they do sound lovely. Full bass,fluid midrange and a soft treble.

All the best with your good idea.

 

Sedgley

Sedgley wrote:

Sedgley wrote:

The difference between a vintage gramophone and a replica can be outstanding. Back then designers took every effort to create machines that would sound good. It was not merely the case of sticking a few parts together and hoping for the best. Victor and HMV introduced a new type of acoustic gramophone in the mid 1920's. This used maths to work out the length and diameter of the internal horn needed to give the new records the chance of being heard properly.

Horn gramophones,that is the type with an external horn,should never be used to play any record made after,say,1930,and especially not the plastic 78's made in the 1950's. The sound boxes on them are too inflexible. If you do get a vintage model try to get one with an internal horn,and with a sound box capable of using semi-permanent needles. You may have to change records every 3 or 4 minutes but the fiddly task of changing needles is reduced.

As regards volume,don't be fooled. Using a loud tone needle the acoustic output from a gramophone can fill a small hall. I once knew a chap who owned several gramophones,including a big HMV floor standing model and that sounded delightful and could rattle the window!

Not all 78's were made the same. The early ones used a variety of groove size,which is why 78 fans use a number of stylii to play back. A stylus whichsounds good on a 1950's 78 will not on one made 25 years earlier,and when these old records are played back correctly they do sound lovely. Full bass,fluid midrange and a soft treble.

All the best with your good idea.

 

Sedgley

 

Hi Sedgley 

 

Great! Thanks alot for your info ! the more i Know the better! I will look into the internal horns... I think I will have a custom night where by I can be there to change the records and people can have a go. The tip on not playing records older than the 30's - if I get lets say a horn gramophone with and interanl horn could i possibly play records later than 1930? or still a no go?  

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