What ` Turned you on to Opera`

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What ` Turned you on to Opera`

Did you one day hear a recording and think mein gott i like that i must find what that was and see if there is more like it.

My early experience of listenng to opera was some Gilbert and Sullivan of

cause sung in English on tv.That turned me of the idea of opera for the next 20 years.Then one day i played an old 45 of Carlo Bengonzi singing Puccini`s

Che Gilda Manina aria from `La Boheme`.

I was hooked.Then it was down to the local libary to borrow the

Tebaldi/Begonzi/Decca and Callas/Di Stefano/Emi offerings.

A golden age of singers for us,never to be repeated

Cheers/Chris

RE: What ` Turned you on to Opera`

What turned me onto opera was the public library's riches of LPs. My favorite aria back in my adolescence was De Espana Vengo from a zarzuela sung by Caballe.Then the experience snowballed into collecting discs. 

A music lover currently living in the middle of nowhere. 

RE: What ` Turned you on to Opera`

My opera loving friends got me into opera by playing their newly purchased CD recordings before, during and after dinner at a stupidly loud volume. At the time CDs were just coming on the market and choice of complete opera recordings was limited to just one or two available recordings. I have fond memories of hearing Tosca and Norma from EMI with Callas in their first issue on disc and Boheme and Butterfly from Decca with Tebaldi. Their deep love for the works in question and their response to hearing cherished recordings given a new lease of life in the new format made me want to hear more.

These sets would now be classified under the historical category I suppose and when I began to collect versions I sought out versions in more up-to-date sound with singers who were still around on the international opera scene. My friends questioned my choices at the time as they remained faithful to artists they had seen in the theatre.

RE: What ` Turned you on to Opera`

I went to one.

RE: What ` Turned you on to Opera`

deadelvis wrote:

Then it was down to the local libary to borrow the

Tebaldi/Begonzi/Decca and Callas/Di Stefano/Emi offerings.

A golden age of singers for us,never to be repeated

Cheers/Chris

With opera lovers, the golden age always seems to be the one just gone. Back in the 60s when I first started taking a real interest in the genre people were hankering after Supervia and Bjoerling.

Today it seems to me we have a pretty impressive line-up of excellent singers, perhaps a bit stronger on the female side of the house, although in Florez we have the best bel canto tenor in eons.

RE: What ` Turned you on to Opera`

The first sounds of opera that ever crossed my ears was Pavarotti and possibly Sutherland singing Libiamo Ne'lieti Calici. I was only 9 or 10. From that moment I knew I loved opera before I even liked it!

It was a couple years later before I saw my first live performance, Lucia di Lammermoor. Quite a tough choice for a 12 year old girl with no other reference. But determined, I kept on listening to as much as possible until I liked it.

F Mauchan

RE: What ` Turned you on to Opera`
martin_opera wrote:

Three things happened at once:

  1. I heard Nessun Dorma on an advert for Pirelli and found that my parents had an LP of "Your Hundred Best Tunes" with James McCracken singing it.  Wow! 
  2. I heard Kiri Te Kanawa sing beim Schlafengehen from Strauss' Four Last Songs in the film The Year of Living Dangerously and borrowed it from my library.
  3. DECCA released an Essential Opera CD that I bought and adored.  It had the finale of Act One of Turandot on it and I used to play it so loudly that the people across the road commented!

I then acquired DECCA's Your Hundred Best Opera Tunes Vols 1-6 which introduced me to the delights of Tebaldi, Di Stefano, Price, Sutherland and Pavarotti. 

I got hold of (can you believe it) Harry Enfield's Guide to Opera book and went through it buying the recommended recordings - in order if I can remember Boheme (Karajan), Trovatore (Mehta), Butterfly (Barbirolli), Aida (Solti), Carmen (Karajan w L Price) and Rigoletto (Serafin).  My memory fails me at that point!

Since then I have acquired over 300 recordings of operas - many now on my i-Pod to save space and I have not stopped collecting and branching out but my first love of Bel Canto remains my best love. 

The first opera I saw was Norma at Scottish Opera with Jane Eaglen and I was BLOWN away by it.  That then got me into Bellini and Donizetti.  Can't remember who the Adalgisa was.

Funny enough I never did like Cosi Fan Tutte in my early years but it is now my favourite opera and the best recording to my mind is that of Eugen Jochum with the Berlin Phil with Gardiner coming a close second.

Hi martin_opera. Spent time responding to your post but it was lost yet again. Getting very annoyed to say the least at the lack of ability to on this site to comminicate and yes I avoided swearing about this. How many responses I post must disappear into the ether?

To the admininstrators of this forum I urge you to get the glitches sorted please.

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