Beethoven Violin concerto

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RE: Beethoven Violin concerto

ganymede wrote:

As a variant to Menuhin/Furtwangler there's the Roehn/Furtwangler from 1944, the last concert recorded in the old Philharmonie before its destruction. You can listen to it for free (and - with a little bit of know-how download it) at http://www.kulturradio.de/zum_nachhoeren/furtwaengler.html . Otherwise it is distributed by Deutsche Grammophon.

The sound quality is stunning for the age of the recording, better in terms of presence than the Menuhin/Furtwangler recordings (Philharmonia & Lucerne).

In stereo I best like Perlman/Giulini. 

Thanks for the link, ganymede.

The Furtwangler recording is splendid, and so are the other gems on that page: Schubert's 9th and Beethoven's Eroica (Furtwangler and early Karajan), and the premiere of the "Hymnisches Konzert" by Heinz Schubert in 1942 in great quality sound. As an organist, it's very exciting to hear this rarely, if ever, performed work.

How did you manage to download the music, btw? I may be a idiot, but I don't see the "download" button next to the web player...

EDIT: Never mind, found it out. Opening the source code in Firefox gives you the links to the mp3's.

Too bad quality is pretty low. 128 kbps? Come on.

RE: Beethoven Violin concerto

My two favourite recordings of this superb concerto are: Heifetz with the Boston Symphony under Charles Munch, and Menuhin with the Vienna Philharmonic conducted by Constantin Silvestri (this latter one I have on vinyl).

My current favorites are

My current favorites are Menuhin/Furtwangler and Faust/Abbado.

Beethoven Violin Concerto

There are a number of contenders.  Generally speaking the older the Menuhin the better as his technique decined with age.  Therefore, either of the 40s versions with Furtwaengler in Berlin or Lucerne.  Menuhin had a special intensity in the slow movement.  There is a case for the 50s Oistrakh/Cluytens but it would have been better with Klemperer who had to pull out because of illness. And, yes, Huberman must be considered - a great artist his 30s recording contains a first movement at a more genuine allegro.  And finally, among Jewish violinists, Fritz Kreisler in 1926 just after the introduction of electrical recording in summer 25.  One non-Jew.  Georg Kulenkampff made a great recording of the concerto in 1936 which some critics consider better than 40s Menuhin. Recorded in Nazi Berlin with conductor Schmidt-Isserstedt (who had a Jewish wife) the artists had the courage to include the Kreisler cadenzas in the recording - not that even the musical Fuehrer would have known the difference!

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