Chailly's new Beethoven cycle and the Gramophone video interviews

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Chailly's new Beethoven cycle and the Gramophone video interviews

Has anybody noticed that the recordings of Beethoven symphonies used as the background to the three Chailly video interviews don't seem to match the interpretations as described by the conductor, especially his attempts to use Beethoven's tempo markings? 

Furthermore, the excerpt from the Eroica available through the Player's Awards 2011 issue reveals that the real Chailly recordings thankfully use the current Leipzig 19th-century string seating arrangement: divided violins, cellos left, violas right. The interview background recordings seem to have the inferior "modern" seating (invented by Henry Wood around 1910) with all the violins on the left. 

If the background Beethoven is not all from Chailly's cycle, the Gramophone is doing a disservice to that cycle to use them in those interviews for on the basis of the true Eroica excerpt it is one of the most interesting modern-instrument cycles to appear in years. 

RE: Chailly's new Beethoven

I agree - as best I can tell, these are 'generic' recordings and not related to the new Chailly release.

As for these being new videos - they have been on Youtube for weeks.

RE: Chailly's new Beethoven cycle

They are just trying to sell you something. Recording companies don't have morals, just shareholders.

RE: Chailly's new Beethoven cycle

sorry, but with all my respects I don't believe that Chailly -a somewhat tasteless and merely literal and conventional conductor, for my taste- be able to provide something new in this ultra-exploited repertoire. Apart from like we know the competition it's really fierce here. I'll could post to you that this is no more than other integral, which adds to the previous conducted by Barenboim, Vanska, Thielemann, etc., that in a first time could surprise to us, but  sooner or later you'll return to the ancient Furt, Klemperer....or Karajan, inclusive. I give you signed this!! Excuse my english please. oscar.olavarria

 

RE: Chailly's new Beethoven cycle
RE: Chailly's new Beethoven cycle

oscar.olavarria wrote:

sorry, but with all my respects I don't believe that Chailly -a somewhat tasteless and merely literal and conventional conductor, for my taste- be able to provide something new in this ultra-exploited repertoire.

I'm not sure why you would use the word "tasteless" to describe Chailly or how you can use both "tasteless" and "conventional" in the same description, unless perhaps you are confusing  the meaning of "bland" and "tasteless"?

In any case I don't think I would agree with your assessment. There are plenty of things in this set which are unusual or of interest, not least the way Chailly has managed to combine a very fast, ultra lean period instrument sound with a big orchestra. It certainly sounds different to other period instrument influenced versions I've heard. The whole set is very satisfying, as were the live performances I attended when it first came out.

Ted

 

 

RE: Chailly's new Beethoven cycle

Ted,

I wanted to say flat and unimaginative, but seems that you think different about it. That heaven judged us! oscar.olavarria

 

RE: Chailly's new Beethoven cycle

oscar.olavarria wrote:

... a somewhat tasteless and merely literal and conventional conductor, for my taste...

It's good that you added "for my taste", but even then I think your assertions couldn't be further from the truth. Conventional? I remember when Chailly took over from Haitink at the Concertgebouw, and pumped new life in the orchestra, which had been lulled to sleep by then by grandpa Haitink. If you compare his Mahler and Bruckner to Haitink's the difference couln't be greater. And even if you judge say Chailly's Mahler recordings on their own merits, they stand out among the fierce competition, making them my first choice in many works. It's like the scores have been cleaned of all the romantic dust and grease which had become part of the misguided "Mahler tradition". Chailly allowed the music to speak for itself without unnecessary interpretational interventions - and when he intervened, he often emphasized the modern, 20th century elements of Mahler's music, the ingenious counterpoint and striking harmonies. If that's what you call a "literal" style, I can agree, but I find it a compliment.

RE: Chailly's new Beethoven cycle.

I can agree with most of what you said, 50m, but Chailly's Beethoven is far from what it could be expected. A sort of fast and furious rendition, which after the first impression, eventually leaves some of us cold. Some were more excited.

However, I have seen him "live" in Leipzig few times, in "heavier" repertory (Bruckner, Mahler and Verdi) and he was almost absolutely stunning, convincing and thrilling with an orchestra that really helped him the most.

Parla

RE: Chailly's new Beethoven cycle

VicJayL wrote:

Thanks, 50M, that kind of comment makes a listen for oneself almost compulsory.   I'll give one a go (on Spotify).  Any one in particular, you would like to recommend to try first? 

Vic.

Vic, I'm very fond of Chailly's 7th, better than any other version I know. Splendid recording. The 9th I find very successful too, but opinions may be divided on that one. Some people will argue that Chailly doesn't go "deep" enough there. I personally think what he does in the first movement is stunning, making every contrapunctual line stand out, like in a Webern or Schoenberg piece. And I'm not a fan of the established tradition of turning this symphony in a huge tearjerker anyway (I'm looking at you, Abbado.)

RE: Chailly's new Beethoven cycl

Italians are not to be trusted in Beethoven. Abbado is the only Italian who has ever spoken Beethovens language and he has struggled with the voice on many a time.

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