Digital overtakes physical

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Digital overtakes physical

I was really interested to read this article on the news page about download sales overtaking CD sales. Obviously, it takes other genres of music into account rather than just classical, but I wonder what the feeling is out there about classical music downloads? Will we soon be saying goodbye to the classical music CD, or are we a harder market to crack?!

Personally, I have not yet downloaded any classical music and stick to good ol' CDs, but I'm interested to hear what others think.

RE: Digital overtakes physical

I've got quite a few classical works that I downloaded and having just bought a new bd player that takes a usb flash drive and recognises flac and other lossless formats and plays them well, I'm becoming more and more inclined to move to this format.

Considering my first classical music came on 78's I think things have really came a long way.

I've lost count of the number of cds and lps I've got, but I do know the amount of space they take up.

RE: Digital overtakes physical

Yes, I moved all my CDs to a Homeserver and stream them everywhere in the house I want to.

When traveling, I have part of my collection with me on my iPod (as 160GB of storage is too limited)

 

The only thing I sometimes think about, is that I inherited some great 78rpm disks from my grandfather, and with data sored somewhere on a server, this is less tangible, especially as my family ia s bit less computer literate.

RE: Digital overtakes physical

Good points made there, thank you. Are you downloading single tracks or entire albums generally? Also, what sites would you recommend? I think I need to try this out.

RE: Digital overtakes physical

For people always on-the-go, it can make sense. For a slug like myself, no.

RE: Digital overtakes physical

The way I look at it, if you buy the electronic file, the first thing you have to do is make a physical backup to disc. I prefer to start with a physical disc (with liner notes) and make my own electronic copies.

Another problem is that some "electronic shops" still don't offer lossless files (e.g. FLAC). Why would I buy MP3s when I can buy the CD, and then create FLAC, OGG, MP3 and whatever else I like. The price is often the same or similar.

Another annoying habit of some electronic shops is charging a premium if you want lossless files. In other words, "if you want your downloads to be CD quality, we're going to charge you more". That bugs me.

Having said all that, it is undoubtedly the future, and once things settle down, it should herald a wonderful renaissance in recorded music, as musicians bypass record labels and make their own recordings, using digital distribution to keep costs low while reaching global markets.

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