Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis, Volume 6

Author: 
Guest

Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis, Volume 6

  • Chichester Service
  • Evening Service
  • Evening Service
  • Evening Service
  • Magnificat and Nunc dimittis, 'Collegium Sancti Jo
  • Verse Service
  • Evening Service
  • Evening Service
  • Evening Service
  • Evening Service
  • Evening Service
  • Hereford Evening Service
  • Evening Service in G (Festal)
  • Hereford Service
  • Evening Service
  • Evening Service
  • Hereford Service
  • Services, EVENING SERVICE:

As this excellent series progresses, we follow these reliable generations of church musicians (which is what most of them are, the presence of Walton and Tippett being exceptions), and recall that composing was a part-time occupation, almost a luxury, in the daily round that normally comprised taking choir practice and playing the organ, giving lessons and conducting the choral society. They also wrote their music within marked limitations: they were to be melodious but not too tuneful, reverent but not sanctimonious, joyous and sorrowful at appropriate times and in moderation, spiritual but (preferably) not embarrassingly mystical. The marvel is that out of this comes music that is so full of life; another, that latent within it is so much sense of drama and so much feeling for the rich emotional implications of sound. It is almost as though within these cathedral organists is an opera composer wanting to get out.
In these present volumes the variety of the settings is another striking feature – Sydney Watson’s setting for trebles only, Harold Darke’s for unaccompanied choir, Dyson’s quietness, Murrill’s love of colour. Almost invariably the individual finds something of his own to add – Robert Ashfield with the imaginative effect of subduing the Magnificat’s “Gloria” to prepare for the mood of the Nunc dimittis, Richard Lloyd reintroducing “My soul doth magnify” at the end of his Magnificat. Hearing again the well-known favourites (Walmisley in D minor, Harwood in A flat), one appreciates exactly why they have so established themselves, just as in Stanford in F (not among his most familiar settings) we see the hand of the master. We also watch ‘modernity’ cautiously advancing – in Stanley Vann’s fine Hereford Service, for instance, and, in Murrill’s “glory of thy people Israel”, a little touch of Belshazzar’s Feast in slow motion.
Then of course there are the virtuoso pieces by Walton and Tippett, valiantly (and very well) undertaken by the Rochester choir. Their mellow tone is perhaps heard to better advantage in gentler music (the Tippett calls for a brighter edge and the Walton for more sheer body), but it is remarkable that such a challenging idiom can be so confidently mastered. Hereford Cathedral are admirable throughout, and benefit from the rather clearer quality of recorded sound. Both are fine recitals and valuable additions to the series.'

Gramophone Subscriptions

From£67/year

Gramophone Print

Gramophone Print

no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe
From£67/year

Gramophone Reviews

Gramophone Reviews

no Print Edition
no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe
From£67/year

Gramophone Digital Edition

Gramophone Digital Edition

no Print Edition
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe

If you are a library, university or other organisation that would be interested in an institutional subscription to Gramophone please click here for further information.

© MA Business and Leisure Ltd. 2019