Notturno: L'Escadron volant de la Reine

Author: 
David Vickers
EVCD021. Notturno: L'Escadron volant de la ReineNotturno: L'Escadron volant de la Reine

Notturno: L'Escadron volant de la Reine

  • Lectio prima del Venerdi Santo
  • Agar et Ismaele esiliati, 'Ishmael', Sinfonia
  • Lectio Terza del Primo Notturno del Mercoledi Santo
  • Sinfonia a quattro senza cembalo
  • San Filippo Neri, Introduttione
  • Lectio Prima Feria V in Coena Domini

The enterprising L’Escadron Volant de la Reine have devised a programme of Lamentations for Holy Week by three composers associated closely with Baroque Naples – although none was Neapolitan by birth.

At the age of about 18 the Venetian Cristofaro Caresana (c1640-1709) arrived in Naples to work as a tenor and organist at the Royal Chapel, and he held various eminent posts in the city throughout his career. His first lesson for the Tenebrae liturgy on Good Friday is sung in a direct yet eloquent manner by Eugénie Lefebvre, and the ensemble of strings, organ and theorbo plays with emotional breadth.

The Apulian Gaetano Veneziano (1665-1716) enrolled to study at Naples’s conservatory Santa Maria di Loreto when he was only 10 years old and eventually became director of music at the Royal Chapel. In his third lesson for Tenebrae on Good Friday, Lefebvre’s ardently poetic singing is matched stride for stride by responsively contoured playing; the pathos-laden slower and softer sections are spellbinding.

The Sicilian Alessandro Scarlatti’s career juggled prestigious patrons and positions in Naples and Rome, but some scholars suggest that his set of Lamentazioni per la Settimana Santa might have been written in about 1706 for Ferdinando de’ Medici in Florence; the first lesson for Tenebrae on Holy Thursday receives an unfettered performance that shows clearly the link between the previous generation of Neapolitans and the next to come (Pergolesi).

A few Scarlatti pieces provide some instrumental contrasts between the lessons, including an exquisitely played four-part sonata for strings (without harpsichord) and two sinfonias from Roman oratorios. An auspicious recording debut, although those interested in this repertoire should investigate I Turchini’s broader anthology from the heaps of lessons by Caresana and Veneziano, and all six of Scarlatti’s Lamentations recorded by Ensemble Aurora.

Gramophone Subscriptions

From£64/year

Gramophone Print

Gramophone Print

no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£64/year
Subscribe
From£64/year

Gramophone Reviews

Gramophone Reviews

no Print Edition
no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Events & Offers
From£64/year
Subscribe
From£64/year

Gramophone Digital Edition

Gramophone Digital Edition

no Print Edition
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£64/year
Subscribe

If you are a library, university or other organisation that would be interested in an institutional subscription to Gramophone please click here for further information.

© MA Business and Leisure Ltd. 2017