Works for Trumpet & Piano

Author: 
Ivan March

Works for Trumpet & Piano

  • Rhapsody in Blue
  • Concert Waltz
  • Theme and Variations sur Le Carnaval de Venise
  • Pavane pour une infante défunte
  • Rondo for Lifey
  • Album leaf
  • At twilight
  • (The) Tale of Tsar Saltan, Flight of the bumble-bee
  • Hora Staccato
  • Waltz
  • Sonatina for Trumpet and Piano
  • Burleske
  • Arbucklenian Polka

This CD provides a quite astonishing recording debut for a young Russian virtuoso, barely 15 at the time this record was made, and looking to be a very personable, totally unspoilt, young lad, with a modest smile. His musicianship is remarkable, obviously totally instinctive, his sense of line impeccable, his taste in handling a melody like Ravel's Pavane, Fibich's Poeme—played with pleasing restraint—or the even more dangerously romantic salon piece by Glazunov called Albumblatt, and the total lack of coarseness in his sparkling bravura (in The Carnival of Venice, or Hartmann's ingenuously florid bandstand encore, the Arbucklerian Polka), all give much pleasure.
He finds wit in Siegfried Stolte's Burleske and is also obviously completely at home in the transatlantic idiom, as in Bernstein's wittily ebullient Rondo for Lifey (most winning), and the astonishing arrangement of Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue, in which he virtually takes over the orchestral line throughout, leaving Markovich to cope with the demanding solo piano role (which he does admirably). The pair of them manage equally well the technically very demanding and certainly rewarding Sonatina of Jeanine Rueff, and through-out the recital, this proves a very sympathetic partnership.
Nakarjakov's astonishing command of his instrument—just listen to the ease with which Dinicu's Hora staccato is despatched—is all the more remarkable when one remembers that he began his musical career as a pianist and changed to trumpet after a car accident, when he was nine. In short this is all pretty marvellous, and unless something untoward happens Nakarjakov is clearly headed for the pantheon of trumpeters, alongside Marsalis and Hardenburger. Meanwhile if you like spotting stellar material, and enjoy a trumpet in the hands of a youthful master, you will find this programme diverse and entertaining (though Gershwin's Rhapsody could effectively have been cut back a bit). The recording is well balanced and absolutely realistic and natural.'

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