Beethoven Piano Sonatas, Vol 4

Schnabel, Kempff, Brendel are great but Lewis gives you the best of all worlds

Record and Artist Details

Composer or Director: Ludwig van Beethoven

Genre:

Instrumental

Label: Harmonia Mundi

Media Format: CD or Download

Mastering:

Stereo
DDD

Catalogue Number: HMC90 1909/11

Beethoven Piano Sonatas, Vol 4

Tracks:

Composition Artist Credit
Sonata for Piano No. 20 Ludwig van Beethoven Composer
Paul Lewis
Sonata for Piano No. 31 Ludwig van Beethoven Composer
Paul Lewis
Sonata for Piano No. 26, 'Les adieux' Paul Lewis
Ludwig van Beethoven Composer
Sonata for Piano No. 5 Paul Lewis
Ludwig van Beethoven Composer
Sonata for Piano No. 30 Paul Lewis
Ludwig van Beethoven Composer
Sonata for Piano No. 7 Ludwig van Beethoven Composer
Paul Lewis
Sonata for Piano No. 32 Ludwig van Beethoven Composer
Paul Lewis
Sonata for Piano No. 15, 'Pastoral' Paul Lewis
Ludwig van Beethoven Composer
Sonata for Piano No. 19 Paul Lewis
Ludwig van Beethoven Composer
Sonata for Piano No. 6 Ludwig van Beethoven Composer
Paul Lewis
Only an extended essay could do justice to the fourth and final volume of Paul Lewis’s Beethoven sonata cycle. But space, sometimes the critic’s friend, here his enemy, forbids much beyond generalisation when faced with such overall mastery and distinction. Like me, you may well cherish your beloved sets by Schnabel, Kempff and Brendel (to name but three), but Lewis surely gives you the best of all possible worlds; one devoid of idiosyncrasy yet of a deeply personal musicianship.

Where else can you hear Op 10 No 2’s madcap finale given with such unfaltering lucidity and precision? Try Op 28’s finale for an ultimate pianistic and musical finesse or the opening Allegro where Lewis makes you conscious of how the music’s gracious and mellifluous unfolding is momentarily clouded by mystery and energised by drama. In such hands the final pages of Op 111 do indeed become “a drift towards the shores of Paradise” (Edward Sackville-West) and throughout all these performances you sense how “the great effort of interpretation” (Michael Tippett) is resolved in playing of a haunting poetic commitment and devotion. Such playing is hardly for lovers of histrionics or inflated rhetoric, but rather for those in search of other deeper, more refreshing attributes, for Beethoven’s inner light and spirit. Somehow Lewis’s quiet and distinctive voice can lift even the most familiar phrase on to another sphere and his playing throughout, shorn of accretion, makes all these sonatas shine with their first radiance and eloquence. Admirably recorded, this three-disc set is crowned with a scholarly and illuminating essay by Jean-Paul Montagnier.

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