BERLIOZ Harold en Italie (Manze)

Author: 
Mark Pullinger
CDA68193. BERLIOZ Harold en Italie (Manze)BERLIOZ Harold en Italie (Manze)

BERLIOZ Harold en Italie (Manze)

  • Harold en Italie
  • (La) captive
  • Plaisir d’amour
  • Andante e Rondo ungarese
  • Invitation to the Dance (Aufforderung zum Tanze)

What’s the longest viola joke in the world? Harold in Italy. It didn’t make Niccolò Paganini laugh though. The virtuoso fiddler, having acquired a Stradivarius viola, tried to persuade Hector Berlioz to write something to show off the instrument. When he saw the sketches for the first movement were peppered with long rests, Paganini was disappointed. ‘What you want is a viola concerto’, sighed Berlioz, suggesting Paganini would be better writing one himself. After Paganini had gone off in a huff, Berlioz developed the work into a four-movement successor to his Symphonie fantastique, a symphony with a viola obbligato acting as ‘melancholy dreamer in the manner of Byron’s Childe-Harold’. It’s difficult to see how viola players find it an attractive proposition – 40 minutes of music which can run out of steam, where the soloist gets little chance to shine – and yet, like Lawrence Power here, they queue up to record it. Indeed, Antoine Tamestit has set it down twice.

Power’s mellow tone makes for a poetic reading as the Byronic brooder, his echo of the opening theme as delicate as gossamer. Andrew Manze leads Power and the Bergen Philharmonic on a swift hike across the Alps, keeping meandering to a minimum. The Pilgrims’ March is brisk, the Bergen horn’s tolling C naturals beautifully caught in Hyperion’s recording. Power conjures a particularly glassy sul ponticello in his arpeggios here. The skirling tune opening the third movement evokes the strolling wind players Berlioz encountered in the Abruzzi mountains. Manze goes off like a rocket here, rather like Leonard Slatkin in Lyon, even if the Bergen woodwinds aren’t quite as characterful. The Brigands’ orgy is pretty tame as orgies go; Manze keeps things rhythmically taut and it’s certainly more lively than Gergiev’s trudge in Tamestit’s second recording. It’s the cleaner textures of Tamestit’s earlier recording though – on period instruments with Les Musiciens du Louvre – which act as the work’s most convincing advocate. Hyperion doesn’t place the viola too far into the spotlight. Berlioz would have approved, even if Paganini wouldn’t.

The disc is attractively padded out with a couple of mezzo-soprano songs arranged for viola by Manze, along with Weber’s Andante and Rondo ungarese, usually known in its bassoon incarnation, its jaunty rondo good fun. It’s followed by Berlioz’s orchestration of The Invitation to the Dance, which arguably contains the best music on the disc.

Gramophone Subscriptions

From£67/year

Gramophone Print

Gramophone Print

no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe
From£67/year

Gramophone Reviews

Gramophone Reviews

no Print Edition
no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe
From£67/year

Gramophone Digital Edition

Gramophone Digital Edition

no Print Edition
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe

If you are a library, university or other organisation that would be interested in an institutional subscription to Gramophone please click here for further information.

© MA Business and Leisure Ltd. 2018