Dowland Seaven Teares

A strong‚ eloquently played recording

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Dowland Seaven Teares noyse

DOWLAND Seaven Teares

  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, Lachrimae Antiquae
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, Lachrimae Antiqaue Novae
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, Lachrimae Gementes
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, Lachrimae Tristes
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, Lachrimae Coactae
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, Lachrimae Amantis
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, Lachrimae Verae
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, Semper Dowland Semper Dolens
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, M. John Langtons Pauan
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, The King of Denmarks Galiard
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, The Earle of Essex Galiard
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, Sir John Souch his Galiard
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, M. Henry Noell his Galiard
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, M. Giles Hobies Galiard
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, M. Nicho. Gryffith his Galiard
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, Captaine Digorie Piper his Galiard
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, M. Buctons Galiard (Susanna Galliard)
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, Mistresse Nichols Almand
  • Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares, M. George Whitehead his Almand
  • (The) First Book of Songs or Ayres, Go Cristall teares
  • (The) First Book of Songs or Ayres, Come heauy sleepe
  • (The) Second Booke of Songs or Ayres, I saw my Lady weepe
  • (The) Second Booke of Songs or Ayres, Flow my teares fall from your springs
  • (The) Second Booke of Songs or Ayres, Sorrow sorrow stay, lend true repentant teares

The Seaven Teares are the heart of Lachrimae; the purpose of the other 14 items is unknown – were they intended to be played together with the Pavans‚ and if so‚ in what order? I have come across no recording in which all 21 items were played in the published order. For example‚ The Dowland Consort follow the Teares with the rest but change their order. The Parley of Instruments do likewise but add three lute solos. The Rose Consort of Viols offer only the Seaven Teares‚ each preceded by a suitably lachrymose lute­song‚ whilst the King’s Noyse here intersperse five lute­songs and omit some of the additional 14 pieces. They also follow The Parley’s example by using period violins instead of viols‚ an option offered by Dowland himself.
This present recording is superb in every way. Ellen Hargis sings in sensitive response to her texts and her diction is almost clear enough to make the printed ones in the inlay booklet redundant. The violins of The King’s Noyse have a rounder and less edgy sound than those of The Parley of Instruments‚ and their dynamic ebb and flow is as eloquent as that of Ellen Hargis’s voice. The recording itself and the annotation are superb.
With so many options available (the above and several more) you pays your money and you takes your choice. Mine rests firmly with this new recording.

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