Goerner plays Nowakowski & Krogulski

Author: 
Jeremy Nicholas
NIFCCD105. Goerner plays Nowakowski & KrogulskiGoerner plays Nowakowski & Krogulski

Goerner plays Nowakowski & Krogulski

  • Piano Octet
  • Piano Quintet

Józef Nowakowski (1800 65) and Józef Krogulski (1815 42). Even in their native Poland their names are hardly known. On this evidence they should have international recognition, for both works are well able to stand comparison with the chamber music of the ‘Great Composers’ of the period.

Nowakowski’s E flat major Quintet of 1833, considered lost for decades, has the same instrumentation as Hummel’s Op 87 Quintet (in the same key) and Schubert’s Trout Quintet. If you like these two masterpieces, I guarantee you will fall for this one. The first of its four movements (15 minutes with exposition repeat) has a second subject which the booklet identifies with some justification as ‘one of the most beautiful in the whole of the 19th-century Polish chamber literature’. Then comes a fiery C minor Presto (performing the function of a scherzo), a Romance and a sonata-rondo finale. Nowakowski, by all accounts, was an accomplished pianist (Chopin took a keen interest in his music) and Nelson Goerner is kept on the qui vive throughout. If he is the de facto star of proceedings, rightly setting the pace and tone, his partners match him every step of the way, and in the thrilling note-spinning finale do so with palpable glee.

It is this same youthful camaraderie that permeates the performance of Krogulski’s four-movement Octet, another winner which must surely find its way into the regular repertoire. Composed in 1834, it seems to have been modelled on Hummel’s Septet in D minor and was written when its wunderkind composer-pianist was a mere 19 years old (he died, even younger than Chopin, from tuberculosis). Goerner again has his work cut out, a task in which he revels with exuberant dexterity, throwing down the gauntlet in the scintillating first movement and à la bohemienne finale, a challenge which the others (notably the flute and first violin) meet with relish.

This superbly recorded disc is the most enjoyable chamber music disc – and the most interesting discovery – to come my way for some time.

Gramophone Subscriptions

From£67/year

Gramophone Print

Gramophone Print

no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe
From£67/year

Gramophone Reviews

Gramophone Reviews

no Print Edition
no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe
From£67/year

Gramophone Digital Edition

Gramophone Digital Edition

no Print Edition
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe

If you are a library, university or other organisation that would be interested in an institutional subscription to Gramophone please click here for further information.

© MA Business and Leisure Ltd. 2018