Klemperer conducts Mendelssohn/Liszt/J.Strauss II

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Klemperer conducts Mendelssohn/Liszt/J.Strauss II

  • (Die) Fledermaus, '(The) Bat', Overture
  • Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Bergomask (Dance of the Rustics: Act 5)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Wedding March reprise (Act 5)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Finale: 'Through the house' (Act 5)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Overture, Op. 21
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Scherzo (Entr'acte to Act 2)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Song with chorus: 'You spotted snakes' (Act 2)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Entr'acte/Intermezzo (Hermia seeks Lysander; Entrystics: Act 3)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Nocturne (Act 3)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Wedding March (Entr'acte to Act 5)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Fanfare and Funeral March (Act 5)
  • (Die) Fledermaus, '(The) Bat', Overture
  • Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Bergomask (Dance of the Rustics: Act 5)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Wedding March reprise (Act 5)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Finale: 'Through the house' (Act 5)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Overture, Op. 21
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Scherzo (Entr'acte to Act 2)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Song with chorus: 'You spotted snakes' (Act 2)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Entr'acte/Intermezzo (Hermia seeks Lysander; Entrystics: Act 3)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Nocturne (Act 3)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Wedding March (Entr'acte to Act 5)
  • (A) Midsummer Night's Dream, Fanfare and Funeral March (Act 5)

Annie Fischer's performance of the Liszt concerto combines perfection and brilliance of technique with poetic insight and a very distinct, aristocratic authority. She is well supported by Klemperer, and this is the best item in quite a diverse programme. Klemperer makes no attempt to invest Viennese inflexions in the Strauss Overture. He conducts a straightforward, spirited and by no means unaffectionate account of the piece: it is a little different from the kind of performance we expect to hear, but still has a certain distinction.
In the Mendelssohn score, too, there is a commanding presence at the helm, and Klemperer's reading has power and strength of personality. On the other hand, there are less attractive features present. The Overture is taken steadily, even ponderously, and both the ''Scherzo'' and ''Nocturne'' suffer from very slow tempos. Elsewhere there is a somewhat deliberate, unshaded quality in the conducting. Sometimes this approach is stimulating, but it could well irritate some listeners. There's nothing dull about this disc, however, and it is well worth investigation.'

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