Nathalie Stutzmann: Quella Fiamma - Arie Antiche

Author: 
Lindsay Kemp
Nathalie Stutzmann: Quella Fiamma - Arie AnticheNathalie Stutzmann: Quella Fiamma - Arie Antiche

Nathalie Stutzmann: Quella Fiamma - Arie Antiche

  • Gia il sole al Gange
  • Danza, danza, fanciulla
  • Passacaglia
  • Amarilli mia bella
  • O cessate di piagarmi
  • Alcina, Ah! mio cor! schernito sei!
  • Quella Fiamma
  • Per la gloria d'adorarvi
  • Sonata a 3
  • Vergin, tutto amor
  • Concerto for Cello and Strings, Largo
  • Se tu m'ami
  • Eteocle e Polinice, Che fiero costume
  • Giasone, Delizie contente
  • Oboe Concerto in D minor, Adagio
  • Giulio Cesare, 'Julius Caesar', E pur così in un giorno ... Piangerò, la sorte mia
  • Prothimia suavissima, Book 2, Sonata a 3, II/4
  • Plaisir d'amour
  • (L')Amor contrastato, 'La Molinara', Nel cor più non mi sento
  • Concerto No 1, Introduction
  • Intorno all'idol mio
  • (La) Costanza in amor vince l'inganno, Sebben crudele

Nathalie Stutzmann identifies a ‘Madeleine’ moment for her in this recording, recalling that Caldara’s ‘Sebben crudele’ was ‘the first aria I worked on’. Doubtless there are more singers out there who would experience the odd Proustian hit from this disc, which samples the three volumes of Italian Baroque opera arias published in the 1880s by musicologist Alessandro Parisotti as Arie antiche. The collection was designed to help train singers in bel canto style, and still does so today, so there will be many for whom these gem-like arias by the likes of Porpora, Durante and Scarlatti will strike a chord of recognition. Parisotti published them with piano accompaniment, of course, and Stutzmann’s project here is to go back to the original sources and restore them to Baroque condition. A long list of orchestrator credits raises slight suspicions that not all have been located, but the sounds are convincing, and the rootling around has even resulted in reattribution of ‘Marcello’s’ ‘Quella fiamma’ to Francesco Conti.

One has to admire Parisotti’s taste, as well as (not the first time) Stutzmann’s rich, wine-dark voice, noble emotional articulation and, when required, flashing virtuosity. Some of these arias are simply ravishing in her hands, from Scarlatti’s touching vignette of wounded love ‘O cessate di piagarmi’ to Cesti’s ‘Intorno all’idol mio’ (sung with a superb close concentration that has you hanging on every word), and from Caccini’s haunting ‘Amarilli mia bella’ to Durante’s infectiously swinging ‘Danza, danza, fanciulla gentile’. At the same time there is no denying that Handel is the giant here, his two arias in a different league of expressive scope and profundity from anything else on the disc; Stutzmann obviously relishes the opportunity to occupy soprano territory in a magnificently moving ‘Ah! mio cor’.

She conducts her Orfeo 55 orchestra with a sure hand, too, though a close-ish balance is less than kind to the strings. But she is the star all right, one of the great baroque singers of our day.

Gramophone Subscriptions

From£64/year

Gramophone Print

Gramophone Print

no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£64/year
Subscribe
From£64/year

Gramophone Reviews

Gramophone Reviews

no Print Edition
no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Events & Offers
From£64/year
Subscribe
From£64/year

Gramophone Digital Edition

Gramophone Digital Edition

no Print Edition
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£64/year
Subscribe

If you are a library, university or other organisation that would be interested in an institutional subscription to Gramophone please click here for further information.

© MA Business and Leisure Ltd. 2018