Patricia Rozario - Spanish Recital

Author: 
Lionel Salter

Patricia Rozario - Spanish Recital

  • Canciones clásicas españolas, Al amor
  • Canciones clásicas españolas, Con amores, la mi madre
  • Canciones clásicas españolas, El majo celoso
  • Canciones clásicas españolas, Del cabello más sutil
  • Canciones clásicas españolas, La mi sola Laureola
  • (3) Villancicos, Pastorcito Santo (wds Lope de Vega)
  • (3) Villancicos, Copillas de Belén (wds V Kamhi)
  • (4) Madrigales amatorios
  • (15) Tonadillas al estilo antiguo, Amor y odio
  • (15) Tonadillas al estilo antiguo, La maja dolorosa
  • (15) Tonadillas al estilo antiguo, El majo discreto
  • (15) Tonadillas al estilo antiguo, El mirar de la Maja
  • (15) Tonadillas al estilo antiguo, El tra la la y el punteado
  • Canción del grumete
  • Cántico de la esposa
  • Esta niña se lleva la flor
  • (12) Cançiones populares españolas, De ronda
  • (12) Cançiones populares españolas, Una palomita blanca
  • (12) Cançiones populares españolas, Adela
  • (12) Cançiones populares españolas, En Jerez de la Frontera
  • (7) Canciones populares españolas

Exhibiting her bona fides, so to speak, in the familiar territory of the Falla folk-songs and some of the Granados tonadillas, Patricia Rozario has the enterprise to go rather further afield in the Spanish repertoire and in fact includes half a dozen items not otherwise to be found in the catalogue (and not even in the new Gollancz Spanish Song Companion, from which the other translations are taken). It is noticeable, however, that except for three songs by Rodrigo the whole programme consists of either arrangements of traditional melodies (or those from earlier centuries) or songs in that spirit (as in the case of the Granados): of Spanish original song composition we in this country still remain largely unaware. There is greater scope here—but I must not criticize Rozario for something that was not her intention. She has an excellent understanding of the style required, lots of rhythmic vitality, an admirable command of legato, and not only first-class enunciation but thoroughly meaningful use of the words: she also has the benefit of extremely good accompaniments from Mark Troop.
Closer observation, however, reveals that she is happier in the lower than the upper register (despite some clean and secure coloratura in the Rodrigo ''De donde venis, amore?'' from the Cuatro madrigales amatorios) and that her boyishly bright voice, very suitable for such things as the Falla ''Polo'', does not lend itself to much range of colour; but this she skilfully circumvents by sensitively varied dynamics and subtle use of rubato. Intelligence is much in evidence throughout: Specially recommendable are the Obradors group and Granados's three heartbroken Maja dolorosa songs (though it would have been nice to have included the cor anglais obbligato).'

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