Purcell Victorious Love (Songs)

More Sampson and delight: first-class Purcell like this is much too rare

Author: 
David Vickers
Purcell Victorious LovePurcell Victorious Love

PURCELL Victorious Love (Songs)

  • Pausanias, Sweeter than roses (song)
  • (The) Fatal hour comes on apace
  • When first Amintas sued for a kiss
  • (The) Fairy Queen, O let me weep (The Plaint)
  • (The) Indian Queen, They tell us that your mighty powers
  • (The) Mock Marriage, Man is for woman made (song)
  • Bess of Bedlam, 'From silent shades'
  • Oedipus, Music for a while (song)
  • (The) Fairy Queen, Now the night is chased away
  • If music be the food of love
  • (The) Fairy Queen, Thrice happy lovers (Epithalamium)
  • Yorkshire Feast Song Of old when heroes thought it, The Bashful Thames
  • (The) Indian Queen, I attempt from love's sickness
  • O! fair Cederia, hide those eyes
  • King Arthur, Fairest isle
  • O Solitude! my sweetest choice
  • (The) Fairy Queen, If love's a sweet passion
  • (The) Blessed Virgin's Expostulation, 'Tell me, so
  • (An) Evening Hymn on a Ground, 'Now that the sun hath veil'd his light'

It is immediately obvious from the first few songs that this disc is truly special. Carolyn Sampson's singing is deliciously enjoyable for its sweet tuning, flawless intonation, impeccable stylishness, shapely phrasing of melodic lines and textual awareness. Each of these 19 songs, mostly taken from Purcell's operas and music for theatre plays, are given judicious performances. The programme admirably shows the variety of characteristics and styles in Purcell's writing, and Sampson achieves the perfect degree of joyful radiance, seductiveness, witty comment or bittersweet melancholy in each song. “Sweeter than roses” is an old warhorse for early music singers, but the poetry has seldom seemed
so personal as it does in Sampson's heart-rending rendition. The Plaint from The Fairy Queen is beautifully done and the line “he's gone and I shall never see him more” is remarkable for its stylish precision and emotional truthfulness (the performance is also notable for Sarah Sexton's superb solo violin-playing).

The supporting players, in particular the continuo team of Elizabeth Kenny, Laurence Cummings and Anne-Marie Lasla, always sound as if they are fully interested in the subtle nuances of the music. Well known favourites such as “Music for a while”, “Fairest isle” and “I attempt from love's sickness to fly” are excellently done, but several of the relatively obscure songs (“The fatal hour” and “From silent shades”) are shown to be equally rewarding and engaging. First-class new recordings of Purcell's music are much too rare, and this one deserves to be an enormous success.

Gramophone Subscriptions

From£64/year

Gramophone Print

Gramophone Print

no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£64/year
Subscribe
From£64/year

Gramophone Reviews

Gramophone Reviews

no Print Edition
no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Events & Offers
From£64/year
Subscribe
From£64/year

Gramophone Digital Edition

Gramophone Digital Edition

no Print Edition
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£64/year
Subscribe

If you are a library, university or other organisation that would be interested in an institutional subscription to Gramophone please click here for further information.

© MA Business and Leisure Ltd. 2017