R. Strauss Capriccio

Author: 
Alan Blyth
STRAUSS Capriccio – Sawallisch

STRAUSS Capriccio – Sawallisch

  • Capriccio

If I could take only a single studio-made (as distinct from live) recording to my desert island, it might well be this one. Not only is the work a source of constant and none-too-demanding delight but its performance and recording, especially in this CD reincarnation, are well-nigh faultless. Indeed, it is one of the most welcome happenings of the CD revolution that so many half-forgotten sets such as this one are earning a new life, and in this case the resuscitation could hardly be more welcome.
Walter Legge assembled for the recording in 1957 what was almost his house cast, each singer virtually ideal for his or her part. Some might say, and I would be among them, that no role she recorded suited Schwarzkopf's particular talents more snugly than Countess Madeleine. Her ability to mould words and music into one can be heard here to absolute advantage. Then the charming, flirtatious, sophisticated, slightly artificial character, with the surface attraction hiding deeper feelings revealed in the closing scene (quite beautifully sung), suit her to the life. She, like her colleagues, is superbly adept at the quick repartee so important an element in this work.
As her brother, the light-hearted, libidinous Count, the young Eberhard Waechter is in his element. So are the equally young Nicolai Gedda as the composer Flamand, the Sonnet so gently yet ardently delivered, and Fischer-Dieskau as the more fiery poet Olivier. Christa Ludwig is nicely intimate, conversational and cynical as the actress Clairon, handling her affairs, waning with Olivier, waxing with the Count, expertly. Above all towers the dominating presence of Hotter as the theatre director La Roche, impassioned in his defence of the theatre's conventions, dismissive of new and untried methods, yet himself not above a trivial flirtation—and how delicately Hotter manages his remarks about his latest protegee as she dances for the assembled company.
Even with so many distinguished singers gathered together, it is the closeness of the ensemble, the sense of a real as distinct from a manufactured performance that is so strongly conveyed. And Legge did not neglect the smaller roles: Rudolf Christ makes an endearingly eccentric Monsieur Taupe, the veteran Schmitt-Walter a concerned Major-domo. Anna Moffo and Dermot Troy sing the music of the Italian soprano and tenor with almost too much sensitivity.
Crowning the performance is the musical direction of Wolfgang Sawallisch, always keeping the score on the move, yet fully aware of its sensuous and its witty qualities: Krauss's amusing libretto has much to do with the work's fascination. Both the extended Prelude and the interludes are gloriously played by the vintage Philharmonia Orchestra, who are throughout alert to the old wizard's deft scoring, as refined here as in any of his earlier operas. The recording might possibly have given a little more prominence to the instruments; in every other respect, although it is in mono, it hardly shows its age. I predict that, now that this jewel in the industry's crown in contained on two long CD discs as against six LP sides, it will be a source of enduring pleasure to those familiar or unfamiliar with Strauss's inspired swan-song. Bravo!'

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