Rosette Anday (1903-1977)

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Rosette Anday (1903-1977)

  • (La) Favorita, ~, O mio Fernando
  • (Il) trovatore, ~, Stride la vampa!
  • (Der) Ring des Nibelungen: Part 4, 'Götterdämmerung', ~, Seit er von dir geschieden
  • Samson et Dalila, Printemps qui commence
  • Samson et Dalila, ~, Amour! viens aider ma faiblesse!
  • Samson et Dalila, ~, Mon coeur s'ouvre à ta voix
  • Carmen, L'amour est un oiseau rebelle (Habanera)
  • Carmen, ~, En vain, pour éviter
  • St Matthew Passion, Erbarme dich
  • Dank sei dir, Herr
  • Elias, Sei stille dem Herrn
  • Hallelujah
  • Orphée et Eurydice, J'ai perdu mon Eurydice
  • (Il) trovatore, ~, Condotta ell'era in ceppi
  • Tristan und Isolde, ~, Einsam wachend (Brangäne's Warning)
  • (Der) Evangelimann, O schöne Jugendtage

The plum in this pie is Delilah’s first solo, “Printemps qui commence”. If that were extracted, Jack Horner fashion, not much would be left for Christmas. “O mio Fernando” shows the singer firm at forte on her upper notes but uneven in the middle register, particularly in declamation. The first visual image is not at all that of the pretty young lady shown on the cover, with her pearls, her bobbed hair and ruched opera cloak, but rather of the joke-operatic gorgon, who is to reappear round the camp-fire aged a little for “Stride la vampa” on the next track. Her account of Waltraute’s narrative has grandeur and eloquence in the Schumann-Heink tradition and sounds not all that much younger. Her Carmen is as severe as her Waltraute, the Habanera having much the same grimness as the Card scene. Bach suffers from too much vibrato and excessive speed, while Hummel’s Hallelujah has Herbert Dawson accompanying in a way that recalls Saturday evenings of old at the Gaumont or Empire cinema.
Relatively acceptable for its time is the Orfeo aria, and the Handel has an impressive if anachronistic majesty. “O schone Jugendtage” displays the contralto depth to advantage, and the second Trovatore solo is a sufficiently fine and resourceful piece of singing to take us back to the starting-point which was that air of Delilah’s. Here, Anday, singing in French, becomes suddenly exquisite, tender, imaginative, lovely in the variety of her colours and the suppleness of her portamentos. She was a highly valued artist and greatly loved in Vienna, where she last sang in 1961, 40 years after her debut there at the age of 18. The quality of the transfers is good, and the compilers have found a particularly fine copy of the Handel aria. That, together with “Condotta ell’era” and “Printemps qui commence” (a previously unpublished take), with the Wagnerian excerpts too, should put the disc on the list of those to be considered.JBS

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