SCHUMANN Symphonies Nos 2 & 3

Author: 
David Threasher
97 678. SCHUMANN Symphonies Nos 2 & 3SCHUMANN Symphonies Nos 2 & 3

SCHUMANN Symphonies Nos 2 & 3

  • Symphony No. 2
  • Symphony No. 2

Rob Cowan reviewed the first volume of Heinz Holliger’s Schumann symphony cycle last December and concluded that, as it continued, this ‘may well be the one to go for’. Since then, however, we’ve had sets of the four symphonies (with one or other version of the Fourth) from Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Simon Rattle and Robin Ticciati, joining other recent contenders including Fabio Luisi, Paavo Järvi and Thomas Dausgaard. If these are indeed blessed times for Schumannistas, the water isn’t being made any less muddy.

In the Second, Holliger demurs from the darkness-to-light trajectory divined by Ticciati and perhaps views the work as primarily derived from a Beethovenian aesthetic rather than a Mendelssohnian one, the notable intensity of the opening movement yielding to a businesslike central pair and a finale that feels more episodic than needs be. It’s a similar story in the Rhenish: the ‘Cologne Cathedral’ movement is amply monumental but short on the mystery distilled by Nézet-Séguin or Ticciati, and again the first movement is the best, if not as ideally detailed as other recent readings.

In its favour, this disc is beautifully recorded, the woodwind favoured just a degree over the strings, allowing their solos to sing out. Brass, too, are given their head, which is especially important in both these works. The WDR SO is a full-size Romantic orchestra with slightly reduced strings for these performances, as opposed to the chamber bands that are increasingly claiming this music as their own; so the direct comparison is to Rattle, sumptuous-sounding if hampered by certain mannerisms, as against Holliger’s coolness. You pays your money and you takes your choice: Holliger’s cycle will ultimately be on three full-price SACDs, whereas many of the smaller-scale (and commensurately more athletic) performances come in handily priced two-disc slimline packs. Regular readers will already know where my preferences lie.

Gramophone Subscriptions

From£67/year

Gramophone Print

Gramophone Print

no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe
From£67/year

Gramophone Reviews

Gramophone Reviews

no Print Edition
no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe
From£67/year

Gramophone Digital Edition

Gramophone Digital Edition

no Print Edition
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe

If you are a library, university or other organisation that would be interested in an institutional subscription to Gramophone please click here for further information.

© MA Business and Leisure Ltd. 2018