(The) Hoxton Thirteen

A mix of styles adorns this well­programmed showcase of fast­maturing British talent

Author: 
Richard_Whitehouse

(The) Hoxton Thirteen

  • Patterning
  • Saturnine
  • Constellations
  • Buoy
  • Los Rábanos
  • partners in psychopathology
  • Rat-race
  • Caught
  • Green Plastic, Pink Oil and Water
  • Deep in Your Coral Caves
  • a beast of burden
  • Cadence
  • Chanctonbury Ring

With a booklet cover evoking something of Punk’s heyday‚ you might expect this disc to be an ‘in your face’ affair. In fact‚ these 13 pieces‚ commissioned for the 1998 Brighton Festival and the 2000 Hoxton New Music Days‚ cover a wide stylistic range within their mainly four­to­six­minute dur­ation‚ and confirm John Woolrich’s conviction ‘that some of the most interesting young British composers are here’.
Tansy Davies’s impetuous but finely judged interplay of movement and stasis is an admirable foil to Jonathan Powell’s translucent‚ evocative ceremonial. Mary Bellamy sets a sequence of fugitive dialogues around an arabesque­like flute line; Morgan Hayes’s piece shares its feeling of weightlessness within a more linear sense of progress. Richard Baker works through intriguingly open textures to uncover a distant Mexican carol; Sam Hayden explores the polarity between individuals and the mass‚ microtones and equal temperament‚ in dense‚ ominous textures.
Alison Kay draws ethereal and increasingly animated music from the combination of discrete melodic cells‚ an evocative contrast with the appealing abstraction of Jonathan Cole’s variants on a chord. What sounds from its title like a contraption from the ‘golden age’ of Blue Peter inspires Rachel Leach to a playful fantasy‚ complemented by a cave­refracted seascape from Alastair Stout’s native Shetland. Julia Simpson’s miniature might effectively find its way into a latterday ‘carnival of the animals’‚ while Oscar Bettison’s focusing on the many­sided potential of one idea could itself be part of a larger process. Deborah Pritchard’s South Downs impression brings the sequence to an engaging conclusion.
With strong playing and brief but insightful notes from each of the composers‚ this is a well­planned‚ absorbing disc representing a new generation of British composers on the threshold of stylistic maturity. In time to come‚ chances are you’ll have heard the music here first.

Gramophone Subscriptions

From£67/year

Gramophone Print

Gramophone Print

no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe
From£67/year

Gramophone Reviews

Gramophone Reviews

no Print Edition
no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe
From£67/year

Gramophone Digital Edition

Gramophone Digital Edition

no Print Edition
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe

If you are a library, university or other organisation that would be interested in an institutional subscription to Gramophone please click here for further information.

© MA Business and Leisure Ltd. 2018