Vivaldi Cello Concertos

Baroque Italian concertos from cellists Queyras and Gabetta

Author: 
DuncanDruce

Vivaldi Cello Concertos

  • Dorilla in Tempe, Sinfonia
  • Concerto for Cello and Strings
  • Concerto for Cello and Strings
  • Concerto for Strings
  • Concerto for Cello and Strings
  • Double Concerto for 2 violins and strings
  • Concerto for Cello and Strings
  • Concerto for Cello and Strings
  • (12) Sinfonie a quattro, No. 6, Sant' Elena al Calvario
  • (12) Sinfonie a quattro, No. 12, La passione di Gesù Signor nostro
  • Concerto for Cello and Strings
  • Concerto for Cello and Strings
  • Concerto for Cello and Strings
  • Sonata for Cello and Continuo
  • (6) Concertos for Cello and Strings, D
  • Concerto for Cello

With 27 works to choose from, it’s no surprise that these two programmes, both centred on Vivaldi’s cello concertos, have only one work in common. The playing of the G minor Concerto, RV416, neatly points the different approaches of Sol Gabetta and Jean-Guihen Queyras (and their respective accompanying bands); Gabetta more suave and elegant, Queyras more forceful and spirited. Queyras’s Adagio, with the lightest of accompaniments – solo lute – is especially eloquent; Gabetta’s ornamentation here is more elaborate and its effect more studied. In the finale, Queyras is more concerned to shape the fast passages and doesn’t feel tempted, as Gabetta is, to slow down for the soulful moments.

Both programmes take steps to vary the unbroken sequence of cello concertos. Queyras’s scheme, alternating the cello with varied sinfonias and concertos for the string band, is particularly successful, with a series of extremely lively (though on occasion excessively fierce) performances by the Akadamie für Alte Musik, Georg Kallweit contributing a beautiful violin solo in the Largo of the well-known Concerto RV565 from L’estro armonico. The two short Caldara sinfonias are striking pieces and sit well alongside the Vivaldi items. Among the cello concertos I’d single out RV409, a most original work in which a bassoon has the role of personal accompanist to the solo cello, the beautiful Larghetto in RV412 with a backing of sustained strings, and the energetic, highly inventive A minor Concerto, RV419.

The cello-playing Count von Schönborn provides the connecting theme for Sol Gabetta’s disc; his library contains some significant Vivaldi manuscripts, including the sole source of the sonata recorded here. Of the three Vivaldi concertos, I was particularly impressed by another A minor work, RV420, with its unusual Andante opening. The Leo Concerto is in gallant style and only intermittently interesting. For me its most appealing section is the elegantly pathetic Larghetto, which would, however, have benefited from a more flowing tempo. Platti worked at the court of Schönborn’s brother in Würzburg. With its finely worked contrapuntal tuttis and picturesque, melancholy Adagio, his Concerto, in this vigorous, poised performance, proves to be a real find.

Gramophone Subscriptions

From£67/year

Gramophone Print

Gramophone Print

no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe
From£67/year

Gramophone Reviews

Gramophone Reviews

no Print Edition
no Digital Edition
no Digital Archive
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe
From£67/year

Gramophone Digital Edition

Gramophone Digital Edition

no Print Edition
no Reviews Database
no Events & Offers
From£67/year
Subscribe

If you are a library, university or other organisation that would be interested in an institutional subscription to Gramophone please click here for further information.

© MA Business and Leisure Ltd. 2019