Max Bruch: Touching the Divine

Andrew Mellor
Thursday, August 20, 2020

He may have been less adventurous than Brahms but Bruch had a remarkable ear for melody, and in his late works he captured a profound level of expression, writes Andrew Mellor as we approach the centenary of the composer’s death

Bruch pictured working at the piano, an instrument he loathed, with its ‘dull rattle-trap’; as he famously remarked, ‘The violin can sing a melody better than the piano can’ (AKG Images)
Bruch pictured working at the piano, an instrument he loathed, with its ‘dull rattle-trap’; as he famously remarked, ‘The violin can sing a melody better than the piano can’ (AKG Images)

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